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Water resistance figures don't really reflect real world numbers. Here's a bit of a guide:

30m/100ft/3ATM/3bar … see more
Water resistance figures don't really reflect real world numbers. Here's a bit of a guide:

30m/100ft/3ATM/3bar

Watches with any of these markings on them are rated for splashing and getting caught in the rain.

50m/165ft/5ATM/5bar

50 meter rated watches are fine for still water swimming such as a pool.

100m/330ft/10ATM/10bar

100 meter watches are fine to wear in surf, snorkelling and shallow diving.

200m/600ft/20ATM/20bar

200 is fine for recreational diving and active water sports.

500m/1600ft/50ATM/50bar

Professional diving.

1000m/3200ft/100ATM/100bar

Extreme depth diving. These watches can handle as deep as you can, but need specialist resealing to maintain it.

A fairly costly mistake some watch owners make is that it's fine to expose your watch to hot water such as a shower.

Watches are not necessarily designed or rated for hot water
As watches are exposed to hot water the air inside the case expands. Due to being compressed, the air pressure inside the case climbs, and the sealing system built into the watch allows the increased pressure to escape in order to equalise the pressure.

The problem however, is when the watch cools. The pressure inside the watch decreases, which equalises the pressure by allowing air from outside to enter the watch. See less
Water resistance figures don't really reflect real world numbers. Here's a bit of a guide:

30m/100ft/3ATM/3bar

Watches with any of these markings on them are rated for splashing and getting caught in the rain.

50m/165ft/5ATM/5bar

50 meter rated watches are fine for still water swimming such as a pool.

100m/330ft/10ATM/10bar

100 meter watches are fine to wear in surf, snorkelling and shallow diving.

200m/600ft/20ATM/20bar

200 is fine for recreational diving and active water sports.

500m/1600ft/50ATM/50bar

Professional diving.

1000m/3200ft/100ATM/100bar

Extreme depth diving. These watches can handle as deep as you can, but need specialist resealing to maintain it.

A fairly costly mistake some watch owners make is that it's fine to expose your watch to hot water such as a shower.

Watches are not necessarily designed or rated for hot water
As watches are exposed to hot water the air inside the case expands. Due to being compressed, the air pressure inside the case climbs, and the sealing system built into the watch allows the increased pressure to escape in order to equalise the pressure.

The problem however, is when the watch cools. The pressure inside the watch decreases, which equalises the pressure by allowing air from outside to enter the watch.

Angus Whitnall
· 6 November 2019
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