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A to Zed of Aussie Slang 2015: Understanding What Aussies Are Saying by [McKenzie, Ian]
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A to Zed of Aussie Slang 2015: Understanding What Aussies Are Saying First Edition Edition, Kindle Edition

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Length: 70 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Language: English

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Product description

Product Description

Australian English like all other languages being used is a living entity and is constantly changing. Many slang terms used by my parent's generation are infrequently used now. Likewise, the language used by Aussie teenagers today is different from the language I feel comfortable using.

With the internet, television and the globalisation of almost everything, cultures are being influenced by other cultures and many slang terms are now almost universal.

However, we do need to take care when we use language in different cultures, because even the same slang terms can mean different things. Two examples which come to mind are the words "thong" and "fanny". These words have very different meanings in the United States of America and in Australia.

In Australia, the context in which various words are used can totally change the meanings of those words. An example is the word "bastard". The dictionary meaning is "a person born from an unmarried mother". It is used in a derogatory sence in most cultures and can be used that way in Australia also. However, in Australia it can also be used in an almost affectionate way between good friends.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 453 KB
  • Print Length: 70 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 150317106X
  • Publisher: Ian McKenzie; First Edition edition (11 November 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00PI8R002
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #455,804 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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on 10 August 2015
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
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