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Through the Eyes of Thomas Pamphlett: Convict and Castaway by [Pearce, Chris]
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Through the Eyes of Thomas Pamphlett: Convict and Castaway Kindle Edition


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Length: 188 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Language: English
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Product Description

Through the Eyes of Thomas Pamphlett: Convict and Castaway is a non-fiction book in the popular history genre that follows the extraordinary life and times of Australian convict Thomas Pamphlett. He became a brickmaker in early industrial Manchester, UK, before being sentenced to 14 years' transportation to New South Wales in 1810 for stealing a horse.

In Sydney, Pamphlett committed a further crime of stealing the windows from Birch Grove House, Balmain, and was given 100 lashes and six months in a gaol gang. He escaped twice before being sent to Newcastle penal colony for several years. Back in Sydney, "temporary insanity" exonerated him from a charge of robbing a house at the Hawkesbury River area.

He is best known for his time as a castaway with two others in the Moreton Bay area for seven months in 1823, the year before Brisbane was founded. Four of them had set off in a small open boat to fetch cedar from the Illawarra district before a storm blew them out to sea. They suffered incredible hardships for 25 days somewhere in the ocean, with one succumbing to the elements before they became shipwrecked on Moreton Island.

Naked, they thought they were south of Sydney and headed north along the beach. They were actually more than 500 miles north of Sydney already and going further away. The trio lived with various Aboriginal groups before Pamphlett spotted a cutter in the bay off Bribie Island. On board was explorer John Oxley looking for a place for a new penal colony. They showed Oxley the Brisbane River. He put in a favourable report to the Governor and the new Moreton Bay convict settlement was set up the following year.

Ironically, for a further crime of stealing, Pamphlett was sentenced to seven years’ transportation to the new Moreton Bay colony, which may never have been founded had he not been rescued by Oxley. The convict colony became Brisbane, capital city of the state of Queensland, Australia.

Includes 106 illustrations: maps, old photos, paintings, sketches, etc.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 15510 KB
  • Print Length: 188 pages
  • Publisher: Australian eBook Publisher (1 December 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00QHEGGA6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #398,108 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars 4 reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting 15 June 2017
By Maranda Russell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
To be totally honest, I had never actually heard of Thomas Pamphlett before reading this biography. “Through the Eyes of Thomas Pamphlett: Convict and Castaway”, written by Chris Pierce, is an interesting look at the life of a man that held plenty of adventure, danger, crime, and drama. This historical storyline centers around the unique crime and punishment system that was a part of Australia’s infamous past, back when people were actually shipped off to Australia to be held in penal colonies. Of course, the most interesting part of Pamphlett’s story is no doubt the time he spent as a castaway for seven months in 1823. Their interactions with the aboriginals while stranded are certainly culturally fascinating, and even though Pamphlett and his cohorts weren’t exactly the nicest guys on the block, you do have to appreciate their survival instincts and ability to tackle the harsh elements of a yet untamed land. If history, true crime, and adventure are your preferred genres, this will no doubt be an engaging read.
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome Historical Book 15 June 2017
By V.E. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Through the Eyes of Thomas Pamphlett: Convict and Castaway by Chris Pearce tells an engaging story of history as well as crime and punishment in the not too distant past. Pamphlett began life in horrific conditions in Manchester, and worked as a brickmaker at a young age. The way in which Pearce describes Manchester is fascinating; he manages to convey exactly how dire the living conditions were and how the industrial impact on the city changed the living conditions as well as the economy. The story moves on and follows Pamphlett as a convict; a result of his stealing a horse. Harsh realities take over his life, and again, Pearce does a masterful job of expounding on the absolutely horrifying conditions and circumstances that Pamphlett has to endure. This is a thoroughly engaging look at history and one man's place in it; the addition of the many illustrations makes the story even more gripping. Highly recommend for an educational journey into the past.
4.0 out of 5 stars The author does a wonderful job with providing details and really painting the locations ... 19 June 2017
By Kim B - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a well written non-fiction historical by Chris Pearce. The author does a wonderful job with providing details and really painting the locations and time frame for the reader. It wasn’t hard to really feel that you were part of the story as you read along. I found that I really further understood the time frame and the life of everyday person after reading this book. It was clear to me that the author had really done his research for this story and really took the time to write this book. I found that it was really helpful in providing a real idea of what life was like during the time frame that the main character lived. As I had never heard of the main character before I now have a very detailed explanation of his live and the type of live he lead. I would definitely recommend this story to my friends and family.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars `Whether Pamphlett learnt much at school, other than fighting, swearing and thieving, is doubtful.' 24 March 2015
By Grady Harp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
As British-born Australian author Chris Pearce states in his book's preface, `After 25 years in federal and state public service and 12.5 years in two stints in the real world, I am now writing eBooks, researching my family history, doing a bit of consultancy editing, and contributing to a couple of writing sites in the US. I also compete in tenpin bowling. I have a background in economics, statistics, history, management, marketing and accounting. My wife and I live in Brisbane, Australia.' The reason for quoting the author's version of his resume is that it offers a fine example of what to expect in the style of writing of this very fine historical fiction novel: he knows his facts from research and from personal work history, relates to the characters he creates, and relates his story in well considered prose, assuring all along the fact that the reader must remain involved with the progress of not only the paths of his characters but also the themes of the times (the early 1800s) that yet today maintain the schism between the rich and the poor, the haves and have nots. It is a book successful on all levels.

Chris again accompanies us to the early 1800s for yet another keenly sculpted biography, this time the character of focus is Thomas Pamphlett. The author's synopsis is as fine a description of the books content and it is quoted here; `Thomas Pamphlett as an Australian convict who became a brickmaker in early industrial Manchester, UK, before being sentenced to 14 years' transportation to New South Wales in 1810 for stealing a horse. In Sydney, Pamphlett committed a further crime of stealing the windows from Birch Grove House, Balmain, and was given 100 lashes and six months in a gaol (prison) gang. He escaped twice before being sent to Newcastle penal colony for several years. Back in Sydney, "temporary insanity" exonerated him from a charge of robbing a house at the Hawkesbury River area. He is best known for his time as a castaway with two others in the Moreton Bay area for seven months in 1823, the year before Brisbane was founded. Four of them had set off in a small open boat to fetch cedar from the Illawarra district before a storm blew them out to sea. They suffered incredible hardships for 25 days somewhere in the ocean, with one succumbing to the elements before they became shipwrecked on Moreton Island. Naked, they thought they were south of Sydney and headed north along the beach. They were actually more than 500 miles north of Sydney already and going further away. The trio lived with various Aboriginal groups before Pamphlett spotted a cutter in the bay off Bribie Island. On board was explorer John Oxley looking for a place for a new penal colony. They showed Oxley the Brisbane River. He put in a favourable report to the Governor and the new Moreton Bay convict settlement was set up the following year. Ironically, for a further crime of stealing, Pamphlett was sentenced to seven years' transportation to the new Moreton Bay colony, which may never have been founded had he not been rescued by Oxley. The convict colony became Brisbane, capital city of the state of Queensland, Australia.'

The beauty of reading Chris Pearce's books is his conversational tone of writing, as though we were sitting together just sharing information. He sets his atmospheres well: `Young Thomas Pamphlett, real name James Groom, hurried along the dirty, narrow streets. Unwashed and hungry, he tried in vain to protect himself from the early morning chill around daybreak. He was already off to work. A lack of footpaths forced him to trudge through puddles, mud and slush serving as roadways. In darkness and fog, he saw the outlines of hundreds of other workers - men, women and children - all on foot, hunched over against the cold as they shuffled, staggered, marched or ran in various directions towards their respective places of employment. He heard the pathetic cries of undernourished babies from nearby houses. In front of him a woman emerged from her home and nonchalantly emptied a bedpan into the street. If caught, she could face a hefty fine. Used to constant stenches, he did not bother to hold his nose as he passed. The place was Manchester, England, the year about 1800 and the month April.' And so we know the background from which this
fascinating character begins. Throughout the book are extensive drawings, paintings, maps, and even photographs
that lend a sense of immediacy and credibility to the story.

Once again Chris Pearce has written an historical novel and accomplished the feat of making fact read better than fiction! Highly Recommended. Grady Harp, March 15
5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting read about our not so distant past!! 6 April 2015
By Marisa Slusarcyk - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Awesome story. I mean seriously? It is non-fiction and the man, Thomas Pamplette, gets 14 years in prison for stealing a horse. With laws now adays you can commit murder and get less. Very interesting read about our not so distant past!!

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