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Suite Francaise by [Irène Némirovsky, Sandra Smith]

Suite Francaise Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 244 ratings

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Length: 418 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

A masterpiece, Sunday Times

Quite outstanding, full of beauty, pain and truth -- Anne Chisholm, Sunday Telegraph

An irresistible work. Suite Francaise clutches the heart -- Carmen Callil, The Times

The work of a genuine artist -- Julian Barnes, Guardian

Magnificent, The Times

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1

War

Hot, thought the Parisians. The warm air of spring. It was night, they were at war and there was an air raid. But dawn was near and the war far away. The first to hear the hum of the siren were those who couldn't sleep - the ill and bedridden, mothers with sons at the front, women crying for the men they loved. To them it began as a long breath, like air being forced into a deep sigh. It wasn't long before its wailing filled the sky. It came from afar, from beyond the horizon, slowly, almost lazily. Those still asleep dreamed of waves breaking over pebbles, a March storm whipping the woods, a herd of cows trampling the ground with their hooves, until finally sleep was shaken off and they struggled to open their eyes, murmuring, 'Is it an air raid'?

The women, more anxious, more alert, were already up, although some of them, after closing the windows and shutters, went back to bed. The night before - Monday 3 June - bombs had fallen on Paris for the first time since the beginning of the war. Yet everyone remained calm. Even though the reports were terrible, no one believed them. No more so than if victory had been announced. 'We don't understand what's happening,' people said.

They had to dress their children by torchlight. Mothers lifted small, warm, heavy bodies into their arms: 'Come on, don't be afraid, don't cry.' An air raid. All the lights were out, but beneath the clear, golden June sky, every house, every street was visible. As for the Seine, the river seemed to absorb even the faintest glimmers of light and reflect them back a hundred times brighter, like some multifaceted mirror. Badly blacked-out windows, glistening rooftops, the metal hinges of doors all shone in the water. There were a few red lights that stayed on longer than the others, no one knew why, and the Seine drew them in, capturing them and bouncing them playfully on its waves. From above, it could be seen flowing along, as white as a river of milk. It guided the enemy planes, some people thought. Others said that couldn't be so. In truth, no one really knew anything. 'I'm staying in bed,' sleepy voices murmured, 'I'm not scared.' 'All the same, it just takes one . . .' the more sensible replied.

Through the windows that ran along the service stairs in new apartment blocks, little flashes of light could be seen descending: the people living on the sixth floor were fleeing the upper storeys; they held their torches in front of them, in spite of the regulations. 'Do you think I want to fall on my face on the stairs! Are you coming, Emile'? Everyone instinctively lowered their voices as if the enemy's eyes and ears were everywhere. One after another, doors slammed shut. In the poorer neighbourhoods there was always a crowd in the Métro, or the foul-smelling shelters. The wealthy simply went to sit with the concierge, straining to hear the shells bursting and the explosions that meant bombs were falling, their bodies as tense as frightened animals in dark woods as the hunter gets closer. Though the poor were just as afraid as the rich, and valued their lives just as much, they were more sheeplike: they needed each other, needed to link arms, to groan or laugh together.

Day was breaking. A silvery blue light slid over the cobblestones, over the parapets along the quayside, over the towers of Notre-Dame. Bags of sand were piled halfway up all the important monuments, encircling Carpeaux's dancers on the façade of the Opera House, silencing the Marseillaise on the Arc de Triomphe.

Still at some distance, great guns were firing; they drew nearer, and every window shuddered in reply. In hot rooms with blacked-out windows, children were born, and their cries made the women forget the sound of sirens and war. To the dying, the barrage of gunfire seemed far away, without any meaning whatsoever, just one more element in that vague, menacing whisper that washes over those on the brink of death. Children slept peacefully, held tight against their mothers' sides, their lips making sucking noises, like little lambs. Street sellers' carts lay abandoned, full of fresh flowers.

The sun came up, fiery red, in a cloudless sky. A shell was fired, now so close to Paris that from the top of every monument birds rose into the sky. Great black birds, rarely seen at other times, stretched out their pink-tinged wings. Beautiful fat pigeons cooed; swallows wheeled; sparrows hopped peacefully in the deserted streets. Along the Seine each poplar tree held a cluster of little brown birds who sang as loudly as they could. From deep beneath the ground came the muffled noise everyone had been waiting for, a sort of three-tone fanfare. The air raid was over.


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Reviewed in Australia on 9 November 2015
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tangerina
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant account
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 2 May 2016
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Brian R. Martin
4.0 out of 5 stars A snapshot of the German invasion and occupation of France
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 6 October 2014
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Mary Bridget Judge
5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpeiece in every way
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 28 March 2017
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5.0 out of 5 stars Surviving The Nazi Invasion of France
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 29 June 2015
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5.0 out of 5 stars Full of insight - a book to re-read in the future
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 15 September 2015
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4.0 out of 5 stars Read it for the First Book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 13 August 2013
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Michael B
2.0 out of 5 stars Didn't work for me
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 31 August 2014
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LindyLouMac
5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 30 August 2011
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Mrs. Vivienne Tuffnell
5.0 out of 5 stars A truly stunning piece of fiction
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 18 September 2019
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Gillian McIntyre
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a beautifully written book skilfully linking characters from the two section ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 17 July 2018
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Colleen
4.0 out of 5 stars a must read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 1 March 2015
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Katy
5.0 out of 5 stars and its better than ever
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 5 May 2015
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Jean D. Andrews
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant writing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 2 June 2009
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Dr. Peter G. Upton
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book, great edition
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 27 June 2013
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Edita Busmiene
3.0 out of 5 stars Not for me, too slow
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 1 February 2020
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