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Slow Boat to Cuba by [Wilson, Linus]
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Length: 248 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Language: English

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Product description

Product Description

In SLOW BOAT TO CUBA, the author wants to start his round the world trip by sailing to the Panama Canal before hurricane season. Unfortunately, a 50-year old embargo, wild currents, and adverse winds and waves stand in this American sailor’s way. This is the story of how he overcame government road blocks and sailed offshore to the forbidden paradise of Cuba. He stops at the remote west coast and southern barrier islands fighting human and nautical obstacles to get a clear path to Panama.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2667 KB
  • Print Length: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Oxriver Publishing (1 November 2016)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01MFFX9AG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #733,076 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Good read about travel 24 November 2016
By its just me - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Good read about travel, red tape involved in over-seas travel, how to deal with people who aren't always honest and the on going maintaince involved in sailing. Thanks Linus and good luck on your part time circumnavigation.
5.0 out of 5 stars Great sailing story 24 January 2017
By Jeffrey S. Wettig - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Head to the remote and forgotten west coast of Cuba aboard a 31ft sailboat. Great sailing story!
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not particularly well written or conceived! 22 April 2017
By Robert C. Boyer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I thought this book was more the author's crazy mistakes than anything else, like his construction of a support for his solar panels without having it welded together. He clearly doesn't know a lot about yachting. I also thought that his stop at Cuba on his way to Panama from New Orleans was unnecessary and iladvised (even though I love Cuba). I didn't think the book was well written at all--the author should stick to mathematics.
4.0 out of 5 stars Slow Boat to Cuba is a informative accounting of Linus' trip from his home to Cuba. 16 November 2016
By Bela - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Review of Slow Boat to Cuba by Linus Wilson

Some sailing books are “how to manuals” others read more like a novel. Slow Boat to Cuba jumps back and forth between the styles. Linus presents lots of factual information from getting the proper permits to sail to Cuba, how to get your iPhone replaced after it gets wet when you fall into the water at the marina, and how to get water off a mega yacht that turns out to be not very drinkable.
This book does provide lots of good, useful information regarding outfitting your boat for blue water sailing, provisioning, finding crew, dealing with problems along the way, and getting “checked-in” to Cuba. These parts of the book almost feel like I am reading the ships log. Short, factual, and to the point. I found all of this very helpful and informative.
In other parts of the book, I was able to get a more emotional connection to Linus and Stevie. These are the parts I really enjoyed. Discovering how they handled the many challenges encountered in a trip like this. From unexpected changes in the weather, equipment breakdowns, getting water, and their very different approaches to interacting and befriending the many individuals they encounter.
Nothing seemed to upset or bring down Stevie or Linus. Both are always moving forward and not dwelling on some problem but seeking a solution and moving on.
Once in Cuba, it is clear that Stevie is the adventurous one. He seemed willing to hang out with the locals and get a real taste of the local life. But, as Linus said, “Stevie is used to being a homeless backpacker and living on peoples couches”. During some of their adventures, it felt like Linus was the “conservative parent” and Stevie the “fearless teenage boy” exploring a new world.
As a suggestion, it would be nice to know how Linus feels during these trips, if he opened up a bit more in his writing and shared his emotions, his struggles with going off shore, and entering strange new places. Exploring not just the physical but the mental challenges as well. This would be much more interesting than the trials and tribulations with getting a new cell phone.
I am looking forward to reading what I expect will be the next book in the series…..”Slow Boat to Panama.”
5.0 out of 5 stars I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book 11 November 2016
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book to review.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. It is well written and an easy read.

I did find a few things missing. The book lacks heart. By that I mean that the personal opinion of the author is often missing. When you read a book by Captain Fatty, you learn what he thinks of each situation. This book reads more like a text book. Linus Wilson is a professor after all.

There is a chapter on all the hoops that the author had to go through to get the legal right to sail to Cuba. I found it interesting that he filled Freedom of Information Requests to help himself understand the process more and how long applications take to be approved or not. This was good, but he never seemed to say what he really thought of all the requirements.

The author mentions times when there was disagreement between his charts (Garmin plotter, Navionics, Barr's guide and NV Charts) and the real situation. Once he figured out which were correct and which were wrong, you are left to wonder if he took any action to get the incorrect charts fixed. That would be an interesting story to hear. One hopes that the author does try and give back to the boating community by getting the incorrect charts fixed.

I would have liked maps before each chapter that show the area being written about. This would have provided much better context.

At another point in the book he tells you he "spotted two yellow lights to port". He never tells you what two yellow lights on a boat mean. A foot note then suggests that you get his audio album on Navigation Rules. I found this really annoying. Please tell us what the two yellow lights mean. I was reading this book on an old Kindle without internet access, thus could not Google for the answer.

Crew management seems to always be an issue. The book would have been much more interesting if it included the crews' perspective of the events that transpired. Of course that would have made it a much harder book to produce.

Reading the book left you wanting more. In this case that is a good thing.