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Is Shame Necessary?: New Uses for an Old Tool Hardcover – 17 Feb 2015

4.7 out of 5 stars 9 ratings

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Hardcover, 17 Feb 2015
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Allen Lane (17 February 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846146119
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846146114
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 2.4 x 24 cm
  • Boxed-product Weight: 381 g
  • Customer Reviews: 4.7 out of 5 stars9 customer ratings

Product description

Review

Thought-provoking treatise on the soft power of opprobrium, and its important role in achieving social cohesion in an ever more individualised culture... timely and urgent (Economist)

Intelligent and provocative... The prospect of shame is a powerful social corrective (Daily Telegraph)

Thoughtful and measured (Huffington Post)

[Jacquet's] arguments are backed by interesting research and her moral conviction is refreshing (Los Angeles Times)

Fascinating... an incisive argument (Chicago Tribune)

A sharp examination of the role shaming plays in our society and its effectiveness as a tool for change (Paris Review)

Shaming is society's natural stabilizer and organic risk-management mechanism, and one that is ignored in modernity, particularly in the virtual world. Worse: it has been largely ignored by researchers before Jennifer Jacquet, whose book gives us an insightful treatment of a vital topic (Nassim Taleb, Author of Antifragile)

This is a wonderful, important and timely book. It shows us that the glue that really holds society together is not laws and diktats but honour and shame (Brian Eno, Long Now Foundation)

Intellectually stimulating . . . Jacquet uses lively prose and keen insight to explore the myriad ways the shame game continues to impact our everyday lives. A sharp and surprising dissertation that puts the many facets of shame in a whole new light (starred review) (Kirkus Reviews)

It's no secret: we're a celebrity-obsessed, media-driven culture, and shame-or more precisely, the act of shaming others or of feeling ashamed-is part of our DNA. But what if we could use shame as a tool for good? Jennifer Jacquet certainly thinks we can. Her new book mines the possibilities of shame to be used as an agent for positive change. Where the book lands is as unexpected as it is revelatory (Gawker)

About the Author

Jennifer Jacquet is an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Studies and New York University. She works at the intersection of conservation and cooperation. She formerly wrote the 'guilty planet' blog at Scientific American, contributes to Edge.org and conceived of the modernized shame totem pole for a presentation in 2011 at the Serpentine Gallery.

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
4.7 out of 5
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Wildlife Fan
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyed it a great deal
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 24 April 2015
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R. Olson
5.0 out of 5 stars A "How To" Book for the Ages
Reviewed in the United States on 19 February 2015
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Gator
5.0 out of 5 stars It is both intelligent and insightful
Reviewed in the United States on 7 June 2015
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MW
5.0 out of 5 stars Add to AP Environmental Science reading list.
Reviewed in the United States on 7 March 2015
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RobSchlapfer
3.0 out of 5 stars Rather Disappointing
Reviewed in the United States on 1 March 2015
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Molly Massey
5.0 out of 5 stars It would be a shame to miss reading this!
Reviewed in the United States on 26 February 2015
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Craig F. Williams
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on 16 July 2017
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