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Only Daughter by [Snoekstra, Anna]
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Only Daughter Kindle Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Kindle Edition, 22 Aug 2016
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Language: English

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Product Description

“In Anna Snoekstra’s dark and edgy debut, a young woman slips easily into the life of a girl missing eleven years, only to discover the grisly truth behind the disappearance.  Will she be the next victim?  Truly distinctive and tautly told, ONLY DAUGHTER welcomes a thrilling new voice in crime fiction.” — Mary Kubica, New York Times bestselling author of The Good Girl.

'ONLY DAUGHTER by Anna Snoekstra is a dark meditation on the secrets we keep about our families and about ourselves. Twisty, slippery, and full of surprises, this web of lies will ensnare you and keep you riveted until you’ve turned the final page.'
— Lisa Unger, New York Times bestselling author of Ink and Bone.

In 2003, sixteen-year-old Rebecca Winter disappeared. 

She'd been enjoying her teenage summer break: working at a fast-food restaurant, crushing on an older boy and shoplifting with her best friend. Mysteriously ominous things began to happen—blood in the bed, periods of blackouts, a feeling of being watched—though Bec remained oblivious of what was to come. 

Eleven years later she is replaced.

A young woman, desperate after being arrested, claims to be the decade-missing Bec. 

Soon the imposter is living Bec's life. Sleeping in her bed. Hugging her mother and father. Learning her best friends' names. Playing with her twin brothers.

But Bec's welcoming family and enthusiastic friends are not quite as they seem. As the imposter dodges the detective investigating her case, she begins to delve into the life of the real Bec Winter—and soon realizes that whoever took Bec is still at large, and that she is in imminent danger.

As the pretender walks in Rebecca’s shoes, she realises that whoever is responsible for Bec’s disappearance is still in her life.

In this chilling psychological thriller, one woman’s dark past becomes another’s deadly future.

This is a book that will haunt you, read at your own risk — For The Love Of Books blog, cayocosta72



Praise for ONLY DAUGHTER:

“In Anna Snoekstra’s dark and edgy debut, a young woman slips easily into the life of a girl missing eleven years, only to discover the grisly truth behind the disappearance. Will she be the next victim? Truly distinctive and tautly told, ONLY DAUGHTER welcomes a thrilling new voice in crime fiction.” — Mary Kubica, New York Times bestselling author of The Good Girl.



"I haven’t been this consumed by a thriller since I read Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. […] Just when you think you have it all figured out, Snoekstra throws you a curveball that takes you on a wild ride." — That Wild Soul



"The mystery had me intrigued and I read the book with a gripping sense of dread." — Veronica Joy (Netgalley)



"A spooky, sinister tale of stolen identity and broken dreams." — Nancy Simpson-Brice, Book Vault



"[Snoekstra's] smooth navigation through the twisty plot propels the reader along." — Publishers Weekly

"A dark mediation on the secrets we keep about our families and about ourselves. Twisty, slippery, and full of surprises, this web of lies will ensare you and keep you riveted until you've turned the final page." — Lisa Unger, New York Times bestselling author of Ink and Bone

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 616 KB
  • Publisher: MIRA (1 September 2016)
  • Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers (AU)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01E83Q6HK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #54,827 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
“Only Daughter” is an intriguing Australian crime drama/mystery that keeps the reader guessing from the beginning to the interesting twist at the end. In 2003 sixteen year old Rebecca Winter otherwise known as Bec disappeared, move forward eleven years and an unnamed woman who has just been arrested for shoplifting is claiming that she is Rebecca. The woman is reunited with Bec’s parents and twin brothers, moves into their house and starts getting to know Bec’s friends but as time goes by she slowly starts to realise that things and people are not what they seem. As she starts to investigate Bec’s disappearance she begins to realise that the person that took Bec is still at large and that she might be in grave danger herself.
The story alternates between the months leading up to Bec’s disappearance and the unnamed woman's time with Bec’s family and friends and also events from the woman's past. Both the woman's stories are intriguing and hold the readers interest, there were no parts of their stories that felt like padding. The author did a fine job of staying a step ahead of the reader. At the denouement, I was astonished, but the organic nature of people and events gave it inevitability. This is truly engaging. Curl up, invest in half a day, and let it unravel.
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Format: Kindle Edition
3★
A case of from the frying pan into the fire. A girl escaping whatever it was she’s done at home is on the road, hungry, is caught shoplifting, and so grabs at the opportunity to impersonate a girl who disappeared 11 years ago from her Canberra home.

Her resemblance to Rebecca Winter, the missing girl, is so pronounced that even her boyfriend had commented when they saw the notice on TV.

Unfortunately, it seems she may have let herself in for more than she bargained for.

This girl tells the story in first-person.

“. . . a photograph came up on the screen. She had my nose, my eyes, my copper-coloured hair. Even my freckles.

‘Rebecca Winter finished her late shift at McDonald’s, in the inner north Canberra suburb of Manuka, on the 17th of January 2003, ‘ a man said in a dramatic voice over the photograph, ‘ but somewhere between her bus stop and home she disappeared, never to be seen again.’

‘Holy sh*t, is that you? Peter said. . . do you think that’s your long lost twin or what?’”

As she gradually infiltrates the family and friends, she gets more and more brave, always trying to guard against saying the wrong thing, but also trying to figure out what really did happen to Rebecca Winter. She refers to the parents always as “the mother” or “the father” and the twin brothers by their names.

I really appreciate that there is never any confusion in the reader’s mind whose story this is. The tone of the two girls' stories varies, and the change of the point of view is very effective.

Flashbacks to 2003 are Rebecca’s, told in third person.
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Format: Kindle Edition
The interesting thing about this book is that we know our lead character is lying from the moment we meet her. The person we know as faux-Bec is caught shoplifting and after attempting to wangle out of charges via sympathy and coquettishness, she opts for something that came to mind when noticing her similarity to a long-missing girl.

And so... she becomes Bec..

Faux-Bec is surprised when she's not discovered, but the similarity between the pair is remarkable and she’s is adept at spinning a yarn so manages to keep those around her off the scent.

The detective leading the case is suspicious but faux-Bec deftly manipulates the DNA test and lets him think she's protecting her kidnapper with timely amnesiac episodes to deflect any questions about her whereabouts for the past decade.

Snoekstra seamlessly intersperses chapters featuring the real Bec and the days in the lead up to her disappearance in 2003 with faux-Bec's interest in her predecessor's fate.

There was a turning point near the end of the book that I felt a tingle up my spine and you know something's kinda off. There was a lot of potential at this point, but things unravelled a little for me after this.

However, this book offers up something quite different, which is hard to do in the suspense / thriller genre and it's great to see a debut novel from an Australian author in this field.

Read the full review on my site: [...]
3.5 stars
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Format: Kindle Edition
The premise of this book might not be completely original but I totally loved it. Written by an Australian and set in Australia, this book is a small masterpiece of a debut novel. It didn't go unnoticed the similarities, in a wacky oblique way, between this book and Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca – Rebecca Winter / Rebecca de Winter, Rebecca in both books goes missing, we don't know the name of the main female protagonists in either book. That's where the similarities end though, the stories are nothing like each other.

We never learn the name of the main female character because from the first few pages she is caught shoplifting and the police are called. She doesn't want to give her name because she would be sent back to her real life which she has run away from so her quick thinking has her tell the police she is an abducted teenage girl who went missing eleven years ago. From then on 'Rebecca' enveigles herself into a new life, sometimes with difficulty and a wing and a prayer, but she tries her hardest to pull it off because she knows that prison is probably her only option if she fails. Fairly quickly, 'Rebecca' realises that she is being followed and that something was wrong in the real Rebecca's life. Strange shapes loom in her bedroom at night, blood, lots of it, appears on her clothes and bed, and anonymous texts tell her to leave.

The story is told over two timelines – the run up to the time Rebecca disappeared eleven years earlier told by the real Rebecca, and the present time told mainly by the Rebecca imposter, friends and family. She has an uncomfortable relationship with the detective in charge of her abduction; he asks too many questions she doesn't want to answer but she's also very clever at manipulating him.
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