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One Shot: When the world ends, one man's fight begins by [Conyers, Tom]
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One Shot: When the world ends, one man's fight begins Kindle Edition

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Length: 290 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Language: English

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Product Description

Rex has always fostered a bleak view of humans. He suspects the world would be better off without our species. So when a virus, designed to make pests develop an insatiable appetite for their own kind, affects humans instead, it is as though Rex's wish has come horribly true. With his dog, Soldier, he wanders a devastated landscape armed with a gun and only one bullet. Days-long car chases ... shoot-outs ... cannibalism ... unyielding desert sun. 


His situation deteriorating, he seeks solace in recalling life before, with his girlfriend. But as these flashbacks become increasingly real, and fuse with the murderous present, are they more than memories? Should he turn the gun on himself or has he, his relationship, and humanity got one more shot?



Suspenseful, shocking, and often brutal, One Shot is both a lyrical evocation of the unique Australian landscape and psyche, and a thoughtful contemplation of love, guilt, and ultimate responsibility.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 573 KB
  • Print Length: 290 pages
  • Publisher: Arrant Press (19 March 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00J4CIU3Y
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #876,827 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition
I have been debating on whether I should give this book 4 or 5 stars, so I decided to go somewhere in between and give it 4.5 stars. And then I decided to round it up to 5.

In this post-apocalyptic novel, a virus has gotten into the water and turns people into vicious, zombie-like cannibals. They're not actual zombies since they're not dead; they're considered the Turned. It may sound like the same old, but there is nothing typical about this book. There are no zombie hordes or long drawn out descriptions of zombie violence. And even though there are some intense scenes, this story is not filled with non-stop action. It often reads more like literary fiction. The main protagonist is Rex, who is a very realistic character. He is flawed but easy to relate to. And he is a dog lover, which made me love him even more. Rex is left with just his one dog, Soldier, and he treats her as if she were his child. My husband and I are the same way with our dogs because they ARE our children. There are so many nuances to this that dog lovers will appreciate. As a matter of fact, it is very clear that Rex prefers dogs over humans. I certainly can't blame him!

Rex is not your typical hero. Survival is not his number one priority. He is more concerned about having enough bullets to kill himself and his dog quickly so that they will not have to suffer. Yet, he still holds on for as long as possible, and he meets some horrible people along the way (and some decent people too). Some of the uninfected end up being more dangerous than the infected.

I loved the flashbacks (and other encounters) he had with his girlfriend, Kerrie. Their relationship was depicted very well. They definitely had a lot of issues, but it still seemed that they loved each other.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars 14 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Post-Apocalyptic Book for Dog Lovers 2 May 2014
By Danielle Tara Evans - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have been debating on whether I should give this book 4 or 5 stars, so I decided to go somewhere in between and give it 4.5 stars. And then I decided to round it up to 5.

In this post-apocalyptic novel, a virus has gotten into the water and turns people into vicious, zombie-like cannibals. They're not actual zombies since they're not dead; they're considered the Turned. It may sound like the same old, but there is nothing typical about this book. There are no zombie hordes or long drawn out descriptions of zombie violence. And even though there are some intense scenes, this story is not filled with non-stop action. It often reads more like literary fiction. The main protagonist is Rex, who is a very realistic character. He is flawed but easy to relate to. And he is a dog lover, which made me love him even more. Rex is left with just his one dog, Soldier, and he treats her as if she were his child. My husband and I are the same way with our dogs because they ARE our children. There are so many nuances to this that dog lovers will appreciate. As a matter of fact, it is very clear that Rex prefers dogs over humans. I certainly can't blame him!

Rex is not your typical hero. Survival is not his number one priority. He is more concerned about having enough bullets to kill himself and his dog quickly so that they will not have to suffer. Yet, he still holds on for as long as possible, and he meets some horrible people along the way (and some decent people too). Some of the uninfected end up being more dangerous than the infected.

I loved the flashbacks (and other encounters) he had with his girlfriend, Kerrie. Their relationship was depicted very well. They definitely had a lot of issues, but it still seemed that they loved each other. You really get to know Rex; a psychiatrist could easily do a psychological profile on him. There's a certain rawness to this book that I admire. It's a heavy read filled with depth and meaning. Rex doesn't believe that humans are worth saving. But then he reflects on what he could have done to prevent this and how he should have lived his life. He often relived moments from his past and attempted to change decisions he made.

The writing in this book is often metaphorical and quite beautiful. Descriptions of the Australian landscape were well captured. There were times when I had to re-read certain passages to make sure I fully grasped everything. There were also some Australian terms I was unfamiliar with, but I always enjoy learning more about other places (especially a place that I would love to be able to visit someday).

Some of the scenes were emotionally charged, and one scene in particular had me very upset, but I don't want to give away any spoilers. The ending was also very unexpected...

I really enjoyed this book, and I would definitely recommend it. If you prefer high action dystopian, this may not be the book for you. But if you are looking to read a thought provoking story with well developed characters, you should definitely check this one out.
4.0 out of 5 stars War Famine Pestilence and Death 23 June 2014
By Dickthebookie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I almost gave this book a 3 Star rating because, though the story was compelling, the ethereal flashbacks kept getting in the way. It seemed that whenever the story gained momentum, a flashback would interrupt. I realize flashbacks are often necessary for backstory. Perhaps, though, there could be fewer of them or maybe they could be more strategically placed.

But make no mistake; this is a good book. It does what a book is supposed to do; it entertains. The authors make the post-apocalyptic theme much more interesting then the usual gloom and doom. Outside of a few dour references to how the human race deserves destruction, the storyline reads much like a good, quest-for-survival movie script. The characters are vivid and the action scenes are Bonnie and Clyde exciting.

The compelling one shot sub-theme carried throughout the book turns out to be a double entendre. But I'll not spoil it other than to say it makes the ending an unexpected emotional uplift.
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 26 July 2015
By kaye - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book and am looking forward to reading more from this Author
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The virus is in the water." 17 June 2014
By James Liston - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Leaving the cellar after spending a month hiding there, Rex and his wife discover that the fate of the world is even worse than they feared. Animals are unaffected by the virus, but the human population is almost completely devastated. Finding bottled water is crucial, but what's left to live for? Rex knows he'll die and doesn't care; his main concern is making sure that his dog will survive after he's gone.

"One Shot" isn't one of the typical zombie apocalypse stories where the main character spends his time hunting and killing zombies. This is a realistic look at how a disaster affects the life of a real person. Watching Rex as he came to terms with his fate captivated me from the very beginning. I felt a strong connection to him that kept me engaged throughout the story.

Thought-provoking and exciting, I'd highly recommend "One Shot" and plan to read more of the author's work.
5.0 out of 5 stars The end of humanity 3 November 2015
By Holly Scudero - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Rex has been locked in his cellar for a month. One month, while the world fell apart outside because of a secret project that his girlfriend had been working on, a project to create a virus that could make the targeted creature “eliminate” itself. After that virus was released into Australia’s water supply, people quickly became Turned, zombies of a sort, and soon, almost everyone was gone. And now that Kerrie has killed herself, all Rex has left in the world is Soldier, his beloved dog. With no food left and no drinkable water, because not even boiling can destroy the virus, Rex hits the road, doing his best to prolong the inevitable end. It seems that the end of the known world really does bring out the worst in people, and Rex finds himself both doing unimaginable things and avoiding being killed by others, knowing all the while that he could have tried to stop this. As Rex encounters the last dregs of humanity, he simultaneously searches for answers in his past, wishing fervently that there was some way to change the present. Did he really only have one shot?

Tom Conyers has written a fantastic, deep-thinking novel with "One Shot." It explores not only a dystopian future, complete with rabid zombies and horrible humans who think only about themselves, but also parallel universes and the concept of an afterlife. It is extremely well-written, and, while each chapter is prolonged, the story is so fascinating that readers won’t even notice. Rex is a fascinating character, struggling with his perceived guilt over the situation while evolving into someone who takes responsibility for both himself and others in his care; his obsession with having a “humane” way to end things is one of the major driving points of the story. The ending is brilliant, making "One Shot" a novel that will keep your brain spinning long after you’ve read the last page.

Originally written for San Francisco Book Review.