<Embed>
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Follow the Author

Something went wrong. Please try your request again later.


The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering: Essays on Software Engineering, Anniversary Edition Paperback – 2 August 1995

4.5 out of 5 stars 550 ratings

Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle
Paperback
$55.70
Noise: The new book from the authors of ‘Thinking, Fast and Slow’ out now.
Order your copy today. Click to explore.

AUDIBLE FREE TRIAL
Includes your first audiobook free, a bonus book selected by our editors, unlimited access to exclusive podcasts and more. $16.45/mo after 30 days. Cancel anytime. Learn more >

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ 0201835959
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Addison Wesley; 2 edition (2 August 1995)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 336 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 9780201835953
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0201835953
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 23.04 x 15.52 x 1.91 cm
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.5 out of 5 stars 550 ratings

Product description

From the Back Cover

Few books on software project management have been as influential and timeless asThe Mythical Man-Month. With a blend of software engineering facts and thought-provoking opinions, Fred Brooks offers insight for anyone managing complex projects. These essays draw from his experience as project manager for the IBM System/360 computer family and then for OS/360, its massive software system. Now, 20 years after the initial publication of his book, Brooks has revisited his original ideas and added new thoughts and advice, both for readers already familiar with his work and for readers discovering it for the first time.

 

The added chapters contain (1) a crisp condensation of all the propositions asserted in the original book, including Brooks' central argument in The Mythical Man-Month: that large programming projects suffer management problems different from small ones due to the division of labor; that the conceptual integrity of the product is therefore critical; and that it is difficult but possible to achieve this unity; (2) Brooks' view of these propositions a generation later; (3) a reprint of his classic 1986 paper "No Silver Bullet"; and (4) today's thoughts on the 1986 assertion, "There will be no silver bullet within ten years."

About the Author

Frederick P. Brooks, Jr., was born in 1931 in Durham, NC. He received an A.B. summa cum laude in physics from Duke and a Ph.D. in computer science from Harvard, under Howard Aiken, the inventor of the early Harvard computers.

At Chapel Hill, Dr. Brooks founded the Department of Computer Science and chaired it from 1964 through 1984. He has served on the National Science Board and the Defense Science Board. His current teaching and research is in computer architecture, molecular graphics, and virtual environments.

He joined IBM, working in Poughkeepsie and Yorktown, NY, 1956-1965. He is best known as the "father of the IBM System/360", having served as project manager for its development and later as manager of the Operating System/360 software project during its design phase. For this work he, Bob Evans, and Erick Block were awarded and received a National Medal of Technology in 1985.

Dr. Brooks and Dura Sweeney in 1957 patented a Stretch interrupt system for the IBM Stretch computer that introduced most features of today's interrupt systems. He coined the term computer architecture . His System/360 team first achieved strict compatibility, upward and downward, in a computer family. His early concern for word processing led to his selection of the 8-bit byte and the lowercase alphabet for the System/360, engineering of many new 8-bit input/output devices, and providing a character-string datatype in PL/I.

In 1964 he founded the Computer Science Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and chaired it for 20 years. Currently, he is Kenan Professor of Computer Science. His principal research is in real-time, three-dimensional, computer graphics-"virtual reality." His research has helped biochemists solve the structure of complex molecules and enabled architects to "walk through" buildings still being designed. He is pioneering the use of force display to supplement visual graphics.

Brooks distilled the successes and failures of the development of Operating System/360 in The Mythical Man-Month: Essays in Software Engineering, (1975). He further examined software engineering in his well-known 1986 paper, "No Silver Bullet." He is just completing a two-volume research monograph, Computer Architecture, with Professor Gerrit Blaauw. Now, 20 years after the initial publication of his book, Brooks has revisited his original ideas and added new thoughts and advice within The Mythical Man-Month, Anniversary Edition.

Brooks has served on the National Science Board and the Defense Science Board. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received the the IEEE John von Neumann Medal, the IEEE Computer Society's McDowell and Computer Pioneer Awards, the ACM Allen Newell and Distinguished Service Awards, the AFIPS Harry Goode Award, and an honorary Doctor of Technical Science from ETH-Zürich.



From the Publisher

Software Teams Software Teams Project and team management Project Management
Hire, Motivate, and Mentor a Software Development Team that Functions at the Highest Level Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams Productive Projects and Teams The Most Influential Book on Software Project Management
Description In this video training, Mickey and Ron explain what makes managing programmers uniquely challenging, and then provide lessons and tools to hire and manage on-board new programmers successfully, manage and motivate programmers, manage bosses and peers, manage yourself, develop a successful programming culture, and deliver results successfully. Drawing on their software development and management experience, and highlighting the insights and wisdom of other successful managers, Mantle and Lichty provide the rules, tools, and insights you need to manage and understand people and teams in order to deliver software successfully and avoid projects that have run catastrophically over schedule and budget. The unique insight of this longtime bestseller is that the major issues of software development are human, not technical. They're not easy issues; but solve them, and you'll maximize your chances of success. With a blend of software engineering facts and thought-provoking opinions, Fred Brooks offers insight for anyone managing complex projects.
Endorsement "It covers all the essential points a development manager should pay attention to. It will put anyone who wishes on a solid carreer track and make their teams happy teams. Experienced programming managers will be able to closely relate to many of the points and perhaps also disvover areas they may have neglected." — Raimundstrauck, Safari Reviewer. “Their rules of thumb and coaching advice are great blueprints for new and experienced software engineering managers alike.” —Tom Conrad, CTO, Pandora. “'Peopleware' has long been one of my two favorite books on software engineering...Their premise is right: most software project problems are sociological, not technological. The insights on team jelling and work environment have changed my thinking and teaching.” — Frederick P. Brooks, Jr., Author of 'The Mythical Man-Month'. "When Microsoft started growing seriously in the 1980s, everybody there had read The Mythical Man-Month, one of the classics of software management. (If you haven't read it, I highly recommend it.) The main point of that book was that when you add more programmers to a late project, it gets even later. " — Joel Spolsky, Joel on Software and co-founder of Stack Overflow.
About the Author(s) Mickey W. Mantle and Ron Lichty's software careers have spanned system software, multimedia, interface development, shrink-wrapped products, software-as-a-service, embedded devices, IT, Internet applications, professional services, and data warehousing and analytics, but they have seldom found the problems that plague software development to be domain or channel specific. Mickey W. Mantle has directed R&D teams around the world and managed multidisciplinary teams working 24/7 to deliver successful products. With experience in selecting, establishing, and managing offshore development organizations in India, Russia, Canada, and Japan, he brings insight into the challenges of managing software development using diverse staff and teams that are hours and oceans apart. Ron Lichty has been developing software for 30 years. In consulting engagements in America and Europe, he has helped development groups overcome roadblocks, untangle organizational knots, and become more productive. Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister are principals of the Atlantic Systems Guild, a consulting firm specializing in the complex processes of system building, with particular emphasis on the human dimension. Together, they have lectured, written, and consulted internationally since 1979 on management, estimating, productivity, and corporate culture. Frederick Phillips Brooks, Jr. is a computer architect, software engineer, and computer scientist. He is best known as the "father of the IBM System/360", having served as project manager for its development and later as manager of the Operating System/360 software project during its design phase. For this work he, Bob Evans, and Erick Block were awarded and received a National Medal of Technology in 1985.

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5
550 global ratings
How are ratings calculated?

Review this product

Share your thoughts with other customers

Top review from Australia

Reviewed in Australia on 31 October 2014
Verified Purchase

Top reviews from other countries

Mauro
2.0 out of 5 stars Great book, terrible terrible print and binding quality
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 28 April 2020
Verified Purchase
3 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Arboreal Cephalopod
4.0 out of 5 stars Dated, but still relevant
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 31 July 2016
Verified Purchase
3 people found this helpful
Report abuse
specificityy
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, some of the concepts feel dated but ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 17 July 2017
Verified Purchase
2 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Tony
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding and in many parts up-to-date view on software development.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 16 June 2018
Verified Purchase
One person found this helpful
Report abuse
Mr. David J. Poole
3.0 out of 5 stars Historically interesting but only a few essays have stood the test of time
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 4 April 2015
Verified Purchase
3 people found this helpful
Report abuse