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The Ministry Communications Unit: It didn’t happen but it could of. by [Smith, Gordon]
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The Ministry Communications Unit: It didn’t happen but it could of. Kindle Edition


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Product Description

Product Description

Prior to the Second World War, Japan and Australia had been successful trading partners, but after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbour, Australia was soon at war with Japan. Various attacks by Japan soon followed and the citizens of Australia became afraid and were ready to bolt inland from the coastal regions. In 1942, General McArthur set up his headquarters for the Pacific in Brisbane and, as a result, the city needed a civilian population to ensure the smooth operation of its essential services. Due to its proximity to the Pacific battlefronts, it was a crucial geographic point for resupplying troops in battle – from both sides of the war. A plan was soon hatched to make newsreel films and articles that would not only reassure Australia’s civilians that they would be safe from Japanese threat, but, at the same time, they would also be leaked to the Japanese in an effort to convince them that Brisbane was too difficult a city to invade. The Ministry Communications Unit chronicles the creation and development of the special public relations unit that created those movies and articles.

It is also about adventure, romance, glory and also personal sacrifice. The Ministry Communications unit, tells the tale of how the unit developed along with the interactions of people causing interest and romances to begin. But nothing in the path of love can run smoothly and as the young men and women become romantically involved they then become shocked by the horrific hospital boat sinking.



Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 545 KB
  • Print Length: 330 pages
  • Publisher: Gordon G Smith; June 2016 Revision edition (22 October 2015)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B016Q0E8CI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars 10 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars What Might Have Happened 25 October 2015
By Marta Cheng - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The Ministry Communications Unit by Gordon Smith is a piece of Australia’s history thinly disguised as fiction; fiction that chronicles what might have happened – or in the author’s own words, “could of!”. Prior to the Second World War, Japan and Australia had been successful trading partners but after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbour, Australia was soon at war with Japan. Various attacks by Japan soon followed and the citizens of Australia became afraid and were ready to bolt inland from the coastal regions. In 1942, General McArthur set up his headquarters for the Pacific in Brisbane and, as a result, the city needed a civilian population to ensure the smooth operation of its essential services. Due to its proximity to the Pacific battlefronts, it was a crucial geographic point for resupplying troops in battle – from both sides of the war. A plan was soon hatched to make newsreel films and articles that would not only reassure Australia’s civilians that they would be safe from Japanese threat but, at the same time, they would also be leaked to the Japanese in an effort to convince them that Brisbane was too difficult a city to invade. The Ministry Communications Unit chronicles the creation and development of the special public relations unit that created those movies and articles.

Although the author, Gordon Smith, categorizes his book as a work of fiction, the book reads nothing like fiction and, instead, is more akin to an accounting of real life events in Australia’s history. In fiction, a story unfolds through plot, characterization, action and dialogue. Smith’s work is one that largely recounts information, rather than tells a fictional story. The author also has challenges with punctuation, especially in the lack of commas and in the use of possessive forms. However, from a historical aspect and the perspective of what “might have been”, The Ministry Communications Unit is sure to please history buffs and those readers with a particular love for Australian history.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reality or fiction? 15 November 2015
By Mariuca Asavoaie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Gordon Smith has a way to keep you engaged to the book. His style and the story are as close to perfection as possible, just because of the reality that strikes you, the reader. A piece of what could be considered Australian history, but seems to be fiction, "The Ministry Communications Unit: It didn't happen, but it could have!" has it all: drama, romance, fiction, adventure, glory, and the list can go on, depending on what you can extract from it. It keeps you on the edge, wanting more.

I don't usually enjoy the war movies and books, but this one raised my interest. Written in an accessible style, with great characters and some engaging stories, this book managed to keep me reading it until the end, without wanting for it to end rapidly. I was afraid of the fact that it's a war book, but nothing shocking here; the style in which all the story is presented, makes the book readable by almost anyone.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fiction that could easily be fact 6 November 2015
By H.Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I was asked to review this book and really did enjoy it. I can't say a history fiction book is my favourite thing in the world but I did find it kept my attention.

The Ministry Communications Unit: It didn't happen but it could have! is based around Australia's actual history. The way Gordon Smith writes was a very unique way, so much so it felt more like it was fact far from it really being fiction.

From a first glance I thought that it was just historical fiction but the story has moments where it was also about adventure, romance, glory and also personal sacrifice. The Ministry Communications unit, tells the tale of how the unit developed along with the interactions of people causing interest and romances to begin. But nothing in the path of love can run smoothly and as the young men and women become romantically involved they then become shocked by the horrific hospital boat sinking.

I don't want to say much more and spoil it for others but it is definitely worth a read.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No one gets things moving like Tom... 2 November 2015
By dublinebayer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Gordon Smith's writing style is really interesting. He took a subject matter that I am not the least bit interested in a made a interesting story about the events in war and the team that he helped assemble. Smith's writing style is very unique as he tells the story in a rather factual manner even though it is fiction. Another reason why I liked the way the story was written was because of the short paragraphs the author used. It appeared to the reader that the author was not writing lengthy descriptions about each character in detail, but giving an overview, as an observer of a series of events. I loved the way the story starts and ends and thought that it was very bittersweet. Since the story involves a war, there was of course some violence in it. However, I thought the writing was tastefully done and shouldn't put someone off.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unveiling realities and possibilities of Australian History 24 October 2015
By Grady Harp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Australian author Gordon Smith has spent most of his life in sales, public transport and Traffic Management, managing traffic movements through and around major road work sites through out Queensland, his last project was as Traffic Project Manager on the construction of the Gold Coast Light Rail throughout the City of Gold Coast. Gordon retired to Queensland's Sunshine Coast in 2014 and started to take in interest in researching his family. He discovered links back to the 1400's and even a distant link to the Royal Family of United Kingdom. During his research he discovered that he had 6 relatives who fought in the Great War. He knew about his relatives in the 2nd World War but knew nothing about the men in his family who had fought in the Great War. As he has stated, `My Grandparents had 4 brothers and 2 cousins in the Great War. The more I found out about them while researching my family tree it became obvious that a book MUST be written to honor them in particularly for my children, grandchildren as well as all my cousins and their children. It is also an honor to share their story with the world.' That book was Gordon’s first – a brief memoir he titled FROM THE FAMILY THAT WENT TO WAR. That was the nidus for his book – AN AUSTRALIAN STORY – a volume that reflected his rather profound research, a rather magnum opus of Australian history over two centuries worthy of careful study.

Now with THE MINISTRY COMMUNICATIONS UNIT Gordon extends his research into Australian history in a book that is even more adventuresome than this first two volumes. Taking a long retrospective look at the effects of WW II on Australia he has come up with a fine novel of adventure, romance, and personal sacrifice that hits home to many who have been involved in the tragedies of war.

As he states in his synopsis, ‘After the bombing of Darwin, Townsville and the submarine attack in Sydney, the Australian government became concerned with the possibility of the civilian population abandoning the coastal cities of Brisbane, Rockhampton, and Townsville and the coastal cities of New South Wales. It was obvious although the invasion of these cities by the Japanese would be remote it was decided a specialist public relations unit to create reassurance movies and newspaper articles that would be charged with showing the civilian population the defenses that were in place would therefore make any intended invasion difficult if not impossible. This is a story showing the development of the unit, along with the romances and intrigues that developed. Young men and young women, with developing passion for each other and then their horror at the sinking of a hospital ship shortly after their joy of an intimate moment. A loved one goes, missing in action and the surprising events that followed. Being a civilian group reporting to the head of the defense ministry and so could not be hindered by the military in their tasks and they were relied on not to expose any details that may give the enemy intelligence. Even more surprising, would be the developments occurring in Hollywood, Canberra North Queensland and in the war torn South East Asia.’

Gordon’s writing style remains assertive, accurate, and in the language and style of the time and characters, a factor that continues to make his books unique in their effect on the reader. Australia has now found a spokesman and a fine one at that. Grady Harp, October 15

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