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Metaphysical Odyssey Into the Mexican Revolution: Francisco I. Madero and His Secret Book, Spiritist Manual by [Madero, Francisco I., Mayo, C.M.]
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Metaphysical Odyssey Into the Mexican Revolution: Francisco I. Madero and His Secret Book, Spiritist Manual Kindle Edition


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Length: 298 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Language: English

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Product Description

In a blend of personal essay and a rendition of deeply researched metaphysical and Mexican history that reads like a novel, C.M. Mayo provides a rich introduction and the first English translation of the one the strangest, most underestimated, and utterly fascinating books ever published in Mexico: secret book by Francisco I. Madero, the leader of the 1910 Revolution and President of Mexico 1911-1913.


"In my fifteen years of researching the life of President Francisco I. Madero, I have never read a more complete book as the one just written by C.M. Mayo. It will simply surprise any reader. The research is impeccable and the narrative well-rounded."
—Manuel Guerra de Luna, author of Los Madero: La Saga Liberal

"C.M. Mayo offers another dazzling work in her own fluid, poetic and highly visual prose... By the time I finished I wished for a Don Francisco Madero to guide us today, a politican who is also a mystic and intellect.
—Sophy Burnham, author of A Book of Angels and The President's Angel

"Metaphysical Odyssey into the Mexican Revolution paints a complex picture of a curious crossroads in history, where the rise and fall of a regime coincided with a spiritual and social awakening with the potential to rewrite a country's future. Kudos to Mayo for introducing us to both the man and his message."
—San Francisco Book Review

"Mayo... provides not only an English translation of Madero's Spiritist Manual, but also a lively introduction... The author argues effectively that Madero's manual is essential to understanding his revolutionary zeal."
—Kirkus Reviews

"Mayo is a profoundly creative and insightful artist who is able to bring her own perspective into the frame while enhancing our understanding of her subjects. This is a masterful introduction to a topic that hasn’t been explored in this accessible way before, and may never be again. If you enjoy esotericism, history, politics, and the way that they sometimes intersect, I highly recommend you read C.M. Mayo’s Metaphysical Odyssey into the Mexican Revolution."
—Greg Kaminsky, host of Occult of Personality

"In this delightfully engaging book, C.M. Mayo brings to vivid light an aspect of Mexican history astonishingly neglected by most historians: the Spiritist beliefs and practices of Francisco Madero, instigator and first leader of the world-historical event that was the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Fruit of considerable research, this volume includes the first translation into English of Madero's Spiritist Manual, itself an invaluable contribution to the historical record."
—José Skinner, University of Texas-Pan American

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2597 KB
  • Print Length: 298 pages
  • Publisher: Dancing Chiva (8 January 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0064D97XI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Secret Book Decoded 5 November 2013
By H. von Feilitzsch - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Contemporary observers as well as historians have long grappled with open questions concerning the convictions, political beliefs, decision making processes, and motivations of the revolutionary government led by Francisco I. Madero between 1911 and 1913 in Mexico. A hopeless idealist, said most, an inept leader, indecisive, clueless, proposed others. Madero fought the Mexican dictator Porfirio Diaz on principle, deposed him without much violence, but in the process unleashed a social revolution so powerful that one out of seventeen Mexicans succumbed to violent ends. When he took power in 1911, he deferred taking it and gave the presidency to Francisco Leon de la Barra instead. Nine months later, in the fall of 1911 and in the first democratic election in her history, Mexico overwhelmingly elected Madero to the presidency. However, almost immediately his government is threatened from both, the reactionary old power structure and members of his own revolutionary circle. Violent uprisings plagued political and social progress until finally, in the Decena Tragica, both the president and his vice president are deposed and murdered in a bloody coup d'etat. Why did Madero not fight harder against his enemies? Why did he not immediately institute fundamental social and economic reform? And, above all, why did he not listen to those around him who predicted his tragic demise? In a secret book, Madero wrote under the pen name "Bhirma," called the Spiritist Manual, many of the answers can be found.

Catherine M. Mayo does a brilliant job combining the known facts of the Mexican Revolution and Madero's role within it, and creates an intellectual bridge to the president's spiritist belief structure. He was not the hopeless idealist so many historians have proclaimed him to be. Neither was he inept or indecisive. Rather, his personality was deeply rooted in a sharply defined vision for a future Mexico. His inclusion of friend and foe in a revolutionary cadre of leaders, that ultimately proved his downfall, set the stage for real governance: The inclusion of all, the agreement of a whole people on a new social contract guided by justice, democracy, due process, and law. His belief in a cosmic energy that can be summoned and called upon to help overcome the past and pave the way to the future guided his decisions. The Spiritist Manual is the document in which he put into words what guided him in his quest to save Mexico from herself. He never lived to see the final signature under the new social contract that was not completed until many years later, in the 1940s. But his spirit, his unselfish, uncompromising, deeply rooted beliefs, remained... With her translation of the Spiritist Manual, Catherine Mayo opened this incredible window into the metaphysical side of the Mexican Revolution that might otherwise have been forgotten.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An engaging and delightfully witty piece of history, 30 July 2014
By Richard L. Pangburn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My reading this week has been highlighted by the work of translator, poet, and novelist C. M. Mayo, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award. Ms. Mayo is an American married to a government official in Mexico, and her contagious penchant for historical detective work matches my own. In particular, I’m reading her book, METAPHYSICAL ODYSSEY INTO THE MEXICAN REVOLUTION: FRANCISCO I. MADERO’S SPIRITIST MANUAL, which she found in the Mexican archives, then researched and translated, and which she has now put out in Kindle format.

“Spiritist” was a new term for me, but it turns out that it is an older movement than the historical “spiritualist” movement, stemming from Swedenborg, and Mayo says that the spiritists differ in that they believe in reincarnation. Neither a believer nor a doubter, Ms. Mayo takes us on this trip through history blithely like some ghost of Christmas past as played by Carol Kane in the Bill Murray movie, SCROOGED. I can think of no better way to describe my delight at her witty asides and wordplay.

Perhaps the best book I've read in in the last six months.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Glimpse into Mexican History 17 May 2016
By Sheila Breen Urquidi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I loved this book. As always C.M. Mayo writing is readable, interesting and elegant. The subject is fascinating too.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book like new 1 October 2015
By Elaine Russell - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Wonderful writer.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, poetic, magical, informative 10 February 2015
By Sophy Burnham - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Having finished her fascinating Last Emperor of Mexico, C.M. Mayo offers another dazzling work in her own fluid, poetic and highly visual prose. Her translation of the Spiritist Manual of Don Francisco Madero (intellectual, revolutionary, mystic and President of Mexico until his assassination in 1913,) makes this work available for the first time in almost 100 years. It is enhanced by Mayo’s account in the first third of the book of the history of spiritualism from Swedenborg to the present day and in the second third by her galloping history of Mexican independence.
The last third translates Madero’s "Manuel Espirito", concerning the meaning of life. Those who are familiar with the ideas of New Thought, Swedenborg, metaphysical churches, the Bhagavad Gita, White Brotherhood, reincarnation or the Theosophists will find themselves on familiar ground, but the manuel, laid out in a format of Q & A, makes the Mysteries so simple that even readers with no spiritualist background will find themselves drawn in. By the time I finished I wished for a Don Francisco Madero to guide us today, a politican who is also a mystic and intellect.