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Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919–1939 Paperback – 6 November 2014

4.7 out of 5 stars 4 ratings
ISBN-13: 978-1107431799 ISBN-10: 1107431794 Edition: 2nd

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Product details

  • Paperback: 566 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 2 edition (6 November 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1107431794
  • ISBN-13: 978-1107431799
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 3.3 x 21.6 cm
  • Boxed-product Weight: 816 g
  • Customer Reviews: 4.7 out of 5 stars4 customer ratings

Product description

Review

Review of previous edition: 'At every step the argument is developed in a sophisticated way … Making a New Deal constitutes a major achievement.' Julia Greene, Journal of American History

Book Description

This book examines what it meant for ordinary factory workers to become effective unionists and national political participants by the mid-1930s. Through decisions such as whether to attend ethnic benefit society meetings or go to the movies, they declared their loyalty in ways that would ultimately have political significance.

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