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Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by [Chip Heath, Dan Heath]

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Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die 1st Edition, Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 2,293 ratings

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Product description

Review

"Their analysis is peppered with memorable stories, images and facts ... This book is a gift to anyone who needs to get a message across and make it stick" (New Statesman)

"This is great for anyone planning a speech or trying to get their message across at work" (Psychologies)

"The Heaths push beyond what sounds like it should work and explain why it actually does" (Time Magazine)

"... an entertaining, practical guide to effective communication." (Publishers Weekly)

"Smart, lively . . . such fun to read" (Saturday Guardian) --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

Book Description

A bestselling communications book that helps ensure what you say is understood, remembered and, most importantly, acted upon --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B000N2HCKQ
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Random House; 1st edition (2 January 2007)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 2584 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Screen Reader ‏ : ‎ Supported
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 306 pages
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.6 out of 5 stars 2,293 ratings

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4.6 out of 5 stars
4.6 out of 5
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Top reviews from Australia

Reviewed in Australia on 22 July 2019
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Reviewed in Australia on 5 November 2020
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Top reviews from other countries

Frankselbow
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but too much filler
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 4 August 2018
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14 people found this helpful
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C. Weldon
5.0 out of 5 stars Best read of the year
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 2 May 2019
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4 people found this helpful
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Nick Michelioudakis
5.0 out of 5 stars A Review - for Educators
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 15 July 2016
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Review - for Educators
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 14 July 2016
I believe this book should be compulsory reading for every educator. Indeed I will go a step further – I think it may well be more useful to us than any single book on teaching.
The book is about effective and persuasive communication. The Heath brothers start with the Q: ‘Why is it that some ideas are so memorable?’ A: Six key elements [SUCCES]: i) Simplicity (Keep it simple!) ii) Unexpectedness (Surprise = retention!) iii) Concreteness (Avoid abstract or ‘deep’ messages) iv) Credible (Is it believable?) v) Emotions (It is emotion, not reason that makes people act!) vi) Story (The most memorable messages are in the form of a story).
In analysing these elements they explain all kinds of interesting notions, such as ‘the curse of knowledge’ (p. 19). What would happen if you were to tap your finger to the rhythm of a well-known song without actually humming it? Would people be able to guess it? 50% of respondents said ‘Yes’. Incredibly, the actual number was 2.5%!! It is exactly the same when we try to communicate a message – we think others understand, but very often they don’t! (Moral: check that your students have really understood what you have told them or what they have to do. Get feedback as much as possible!)
Heath & Heath go on to stress the importance of ‘curiosity’ (pp. 84 – 87). This is the technique that soap operas, cinema trailers and some gifted presenters use to hook the readers/listeners’ interest. (Moral: Whether it is the contents of a text, or the lesson, it pays not to tell students everything up front. We can excite their curiosity even about mundane things.)
A surprising research finding on p. 89 is of great importance to us; Q: Which is better: consensus-building activities or ones encouraging heated debate? A: The latter! In a controlled study, 18% of students who had done a consensus-type activity chose to watch a short film about the topic, but the number rose to 45% among those who had engaged in a debate! (Moral: use more debates to get students worked up so they are motivated to find out more about the subject under discussion!)
The two brothers also give us a host of useful tips on how to make our presentations / articles interesting (which is of course of immense value for students / adult learners). Here are a few research-supported findings: a) avoid obscure language (p. 106) b) including details makes your argument more convincing (p. 139) c) ‘translate’ statistics down to the human scale (the human brain cannot make sense of huge numbers! – p. 144).
Above all however, remember to use stories. Human beings are wired for story. As somebody once so memorably put it: ‘Facts tell – stories sell!’
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15 people found this helpful
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Neil
5.0 out of 5 stars Love this book.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 17 January 2019
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3 people found this helpful
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Amit N
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 27 October 2021
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