You don't need to own a Kindle device to enjoy Kindle books. Download one of our FREE Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on all your devices.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Digital List Price: $14.87
Kindle Price: $11.39

Save $3.48 (23%)

includes tax, if applicable

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Long Bay by [Limprecht, Eleanor]
Kindle App Ad

Long Bay Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition, 1 Aug 2015
"Please retry"
$11.39

Length: 249 pages Word Wise: Enabled Language: English

NEW: Unlimited listening with Kindle Unlimited
Enjoy access to over 1 million books and thousands of titles with Audible Narration on any device. Read and listen free for 30 days. Learn more

Product description

Product Description

A fictional account of the true story of an Edwardian-era abortionist in Sydney, convicted of manslaughter and left to bring up an infant in prison.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1768 KB
  • Print Length: 249 pages
  • Publisher: Sleepers Publishing; 1 edition (1 August 2015)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B011AO0UZE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #88,993 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
click to open popover

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
4
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

This novel starts with a letter from the Prison Comptroller to the Royal Hospital for Women in Sydney. This letter, the inspiration for Ms Limprecht’s novel, advises the Hospital of the arrangements to be made for the admission of Rebecca Sinclair for the birth of her child. After the letter, in a prologue Rebecca’s admission to the hospital is described, and then her labour begins.

‘Tell him we have the upper hand and we could let the whole world know.’

With Chapter One, the novel returns to Rebecca’s childhood and the novel progresses chronologically. At this stage, I am hooked. Who is Rebecca Sinclair? Why is she in prison? And the baby? Slowly, the story unfolds. Rebecca lives with her widowed mother and sisters and they take in piece work in order to exist. Rebecca works hard, and then harder as her sisters leave home and her mother’s failing eyesight renders her incapable of finer needlework. Then, one day, she meets Donald Sinclair. Donald is the only son of Nurse Sinclair, an abortionist with a thriving trade in inner Sydney in the early twentieth century. Rebecca falls for Donald, but slowly becomes aware that he is not to be trusted. Donald likes money, but only the spending rather than the earning of it.

‘In this reflection she sees nothing of the girl with the blue silk, nothing of the young woman who read books and dreamt of finer things.’

Rebecca works with Donald’s mother for a while, but then Rebecca and Donald set up on their own. A woman dies, and Rebecca and Donald are charged with manslaughter. Rebecca’s story ends with her release from gaol.

Some novelizations of true stories do not work, sometimes the facts constrain the story. That wasn’t the case for me in this novel.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Drawing on official documents and extensive general research into the period, author Eleanor Limprecht blends fact and imagination to create a convincing narrative that tells the story of a woman forgotten by history in her novel, 'Long Bay'.

Born in Paddington, New South Wales in 1885, Rebecca Sinclair was the fourth of six children, raised by her mother who was widowed when Rebecca was two. She married at nineteen, birthed a daughter, and four years later, alongside her husband, was convicted of manslaughter for the death of a mother of three who died after an abortion procedure performed by Rebecca went wrong. Rebecca was sentenced to three years hard labour in Long Bay and while imprisoned, Rebecca birthed her second daughter.

Limprecht builds on these known details of Rebecca's life with her imagination, informed by research, creating a story that depicts a childhood of poverty, a marriage marred by bigamy and violence and the events that led up to the tragic event that resulted in her being jailed. Long Bay illustrates an era where women had limited control over their lives and often struggled under the weight of deprivation and hardship.

There is no doubt that Rebecca's story is fascinating and I was intrigued by the details of her life, but the writing is often quite dry and unsentimental, lacking the emotion that could have breathed more vitality into the narrative. Yet the story is rich in period detail, evoking the city landscape and era well.

A thoughtful and readable novel, I did enjoy Long Bay. I feel it is a story that will interest readers of both historical fiction and non fiction, especially those curious about women's lives and issues at the turn of the century.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
A bit gut-wrenching one way and another. Such times they were, and this author deserves commendation for her depiction of the environment that existed in an inner-city capital city - an environment that no doubt existed in many an Australian city of the times. I'm glad this book was written, and I'm glad I read it.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
Honest, historic and insightful.
An enjoyable read as the characters felt authentic. Life is confusing in the 21st century, and certainly was in the 1800s.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
I found this a good read. Great characters and hard to put down
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse