<Embed>
$34.04
& FREE Delivery on orders over $39.00 . Details
Usually dispatched within 1 to 2 months.
Ships from and sold by Amazon AU.
The Limits of Internation... has been added to your Cart
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Limits of International Law Paperback – 1 November 2006

4.6 out of 5 stars 5 ratings

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle
Paperback
$34.04
$34.04
Arrives: 27 July - 20 Aug
Fastest delivery: 24 July - 19 Aug

Get 90 days FREE of Amazon Music Unlimited
with the purchase of any eligible product. Shop now
click to open popover

Special offers and product promotions

  • Free expedited shipping on products sold by Amazon AU when you purchase select books. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently bought together

  • The Limits of International Law
  • +
  • Taming Intractable Conflicts
  • +
  • On Compromise and Rotten Compromises
Total Price: $98.91
Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (1 November 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195314174
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195314175
  • Product Dimensions: 23.3 x 16.1 x 1.8 cm
  • Boxed-product Weight: 513 g
  • Customer Reviews: 4.6 out of 5 stars5 customer ratings

Product description

Review

"Refreshing and timely"--The Weekly Standard "A valuable contribution to international relations and a useful book for lawmakers and laymen alike."--The Weekly Standard "[B]oldly and ambitiously set[s] out to answer a host of traditional questions posed by critics and advocates of international law."--Law and Politics Book Review "Scholars have long debated why and when states comply with international law; one widely held view is that states do so out of a sense of moral obligation or a desire for legitimacy. This elegantly argued book... offers a simpler and more instrumental explanation: states agree to and follow international law only when it is in their national self-interest."--Foreign Affairs "Jack L. Goldsmith and Eric A. Posner boldly and ambitiously set out to answer a host of traditional questions posed by critics and advocates of international law.... As the central theme, the single most distinctive character of the book is the employment of rational choice theory as it relates to international law.... The creativity displayed here should now whet the appetite of other legal scholars to approach the international law and politics relationship from the perspective of prospect theory, or pursuing policy on the fear of losing an objective."--The Law and Politics Book Review "How much effect does international law actually have on how nations behave? Goldsmith and Posner ask trenchant questions and offer thought-provoking answers in a pioneering effort to address that question through the prism of rational choice theory. There will be a long and vigorous debate about the utility of their approach. Agree with them or not, their boldness and innovation provide a welcome effort at injecting greater analytic rigor into international law scholarship."--Michael J. Glennon, Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy, Tufts University "At a time of rising interest in the intersection of international law and international relations scholarship, Goldsmith and Posner throw down a gauntlet likely to infuriate many traditional international lawyers. Their insistence that international legal obligations are equal part coincidence and rational state self-interest, nothing more, demands and will certainly get an answer. Equally important is their claim to be the heirs of Kennan and Morgenthau in cautioning against the perils of what they perceive to be a new round of legalism-moralism. They have thus raised the political as much as the methodological stakes in what is likely to be a heated and timely debate."--Anne-Marie Slaughter, Dean, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University "Jack Goldsmith and Eric Posner have written a compelling study which provides an elegant analytic framework for understanding when international law matters and when it does not. Goldsmith and Posner show that some kinds of international law are very consequential while others are not. After this study it will be difficult for any serious observer to treat customary international law as if it were a constraint on rather than an manifestation of changing state power and preferences."--Stephen D. Krasner, Department of Political Science, Stanford University "Refreshing and timely"--The Weekly Standard "A valuable contribution to international relations and a useful book for lawmakers and laymen alike."--The Weekly Standard "Scholars have long debated why and when states comply with international law; one widely held view is that states do so out of a sense of moral obligation or a desire for legitimacy. This elegantly argued book... offers a simpler and more instrumental explanation: states agree to and follow international law only when it is in their national self-interest."--Foreign Affairs "Jack L. Goldsmith and Eric A. Posner boldly and ambitiously set out to answer a host of traditional questions posed by critics and advocates of international law.... As the central theme, the single most distinctive character of the book is the employment of rational choice theory as it relates to international law.... The creativity displayed here should now whet the appetite of other legal scholars to approach the international law and politics relationship from the perspective of prospect theory, or pursuing policy on the fear of losing an objective."--The Law and Politics Book Review "[B]oldly and ambitiously set[s] out to answer a host of traditional questions posed by critics and advocates of international law."--Law and Politics Book Review "How much effect does international law actually have on how nations behave? Goldsmith and Posner ask trenchant questions and offer thought-provoking answers in a pioneering effort to address that question through the prism of rational choice theory. There will be a long and vigorous debate about the utility of their approach. Agree with them or not, their boldness and innovation provide a welcome effort at injecting greater analytic rigor into international law scholarship."--Michael J. Glennon, Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy, Tufts University "At a time of rising interest in the intersection of international law and international relations scholarship, Goldsmith and Posner throw down a gauntlet likely to infuriate many traditional international lawyers. Their insistence that international legal obligations are equal part coincidence and rational state self-interest, nothing more, demands and will certainly get an answer. Equally important is their claim to be the heirs of Kennan and Morgenthau in cautioning against the perils of what they perceive to be a new round of legalism-moralism. They have thus raised the political as much as the methodological stakes in what is likely to be a heated and timely debate."--Anne-Marie Slaughter, Dean, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University "Jack Goldsmith and Eric Posner have written a compelling study which provides an elegant analytic framework for understanding when international law matters and when it does not. Goldsmith and Posner show that some kinds of international law are very consequential while others are not. After this study it will be difficult for any serious observer to treat customary international law as if it were a constraint on rather than an manifestation of changing state power and preferences."--Stephen D. Krasner, Department of Political Science, Stanford University

About the Author

Jack L. Goldsmith is Henry L. Shattuck Professor of Law, Harvard University. He is co-author of Who Controls the Internet? and the casebooks Foreign Relations Law and Conflicts of Laws. Eric A. Posner is Kirkland & Ellis Professor of Law, University of Chicago. He is the co-author of Terror in the Balance and the editor of the Journal of Legal Studies.

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
4.6 out of 5
5 customer ratings
5 star 78% (78%) 78%
4 star 0% (0%) 0%
3 star 22% (22%) 22%
2 star 0% (0%) 0%
1 star 0% (0%) 0%
How does Amazon calculate star ratings?

Review this product

Share your thoughts with other customers

Top international reviews

M. Piper
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 5 October 2017
Verified Purchase
Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Report abuse
Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars Great supplement for another perspective on international law
Reviewed in the United States on 1 July 2018
Verified Purchase
Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Report abuse
Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on 7 October 2016
Verified Purchase
Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Report abuse
Peter Monks
3.0 out of 5 stars An International Relations "Realist" view of International Law
Reviewed in the United States on 14 September 2011
Verified Purchase
One person found this helpful
Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Report abuse
Bob Gibson
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on 11 June 2015
Verified Purchase
One person found this helpful
Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Report abuse