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How To Bake Without Baking Powder: modern and historical alternatives for light and tasty baked goods (The Little Series of Homestead How-Tos Book 8) by [Tate, Leigh]
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How To Bake Without Baking Powder: modern and historical alternatives for light and tasty baked goods (The Little Series of Homestead How-Tos Book 8) Kindle Edition


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Length: 143 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Language: English
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Product description

Product Description

Covers the science and history of baking powder, enabling you to create your own leavening power through basic kitchen chemistry. Includes how to make sour milk, buttermilk, and sourdough starter, plus the author's hardwood ash baking experiments. The recipes and science behind them will be of interest to homesteaders, preppers, do-it-yourselfers, homeschoolers, living historians, and historical reenactors. Contains a glossary, a list of resources, and 54 modern and historical recipes utilizing 20 different baking powder alternatives. Available in both Kindle version and paperback.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1709 KB
  • Print Length: 143 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Kikobian (23 February 2016)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01C5UFS40
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Great information 16 January 2017
By Stephanie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's nice to have the information on alternative methods of baking without having to do the trial and error.
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Resource 25 February 2017
By Thomas M Whitworth - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Excellent resource and well written. Enjoyable read.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite in the series so far! 28 February 2016
By Homesteader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Tate outdid herself with this ebook, which is chock full of both historical data and actionable information. If you're like me, you probably understand the basics of baking powder/baking soda --- you can use the latter if you include an acid, but need the former if you don't. But I've been left scratching my head many times when I saw a recipe that called for baking soda without anything I considered an acid to prompt the leavening reaction. Tate's book explained why, listing many culinary acids I hadn't considered and also explaining that baking soda actually causes some rising action by itself at high temperatures (such as in cookies).

Then she delves even deeper, looking at other ways you can get baked goods to rise without purchasing either baking powder or soda. Beaten eggs are a moderately mainstream method, but have you ever heard of the idea of soaking wood ashes and using that alkaline liquid along with an acid to puff your biscuits up? If the world comes to an end and baking soda is no longer available in the grocery store, you'll definitely want this book! And, in the meantime, the copious recipes at the end would be a really fun homesteading and/or homeschooling experiment to combine science with lunch. Actually, as I type this, just looking at the recipes is making me hungry....