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The Great Daylight Saving Time Controversy by [Pearce, Chris]
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The Great Daylight Saving Time Controversy Kindle Edition


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Length: 632 pages Word Wise: Enabled Language: English
  • Due to its large file size, this book may take longer to download

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Product Description

Daylight saving time has been described as one of the most controversial issues in modern history. This encyclopedia of daylight saving time commemorates 100 years of the scheme since it was first introduced nationally in 1916 by European countries on both sides of World War I to save fuel.

The book examines the origins of daylight saving, including the historical development of calendars, clocks, standard time, and the idea of changing the clock to give more daylight late in the day. It looks at the history of daylight saving in every country that has ever used the measure. It also analyses daylight saving in each state of the US, Australia and Brazil, and each Canadian province.

It features many intriguing and often prolonged battles between advocates and critics of daylight saving in countries around the world, as well as lighter moments. It highlights the determination of daylight saving time champions such as the UK’s William Willett, the US’s Robert Garland and Harley Staggers, New Zealand’s Thomas Sidey and Tasmania’s John Steer. It delves into the chaotic daylight saving situations that emerged, notably in the US and Canada, but also elsewhere. Every country and sometimes each state has a different and usually controversial story to tell.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 44248 KB
  • Print Length: 632 pages
  • Publisher: Australian Ebook Publisher (5 April 2017)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B06Y2R5KQ7
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #663,125 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars 3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ‘Measuring time has always been about tracking the movement of the sun, moon, planets and stars.’ 2 May 2017
By Grady Harp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As British-born Australian author Chris Pearce states in his book's preface, `After 25 years in federal and state public service and 12.5 years in two stints in the real world, I am now writing eBooks, researching my family history, doing a bit of consultancy editing, and contributing to a couple of writing sites in the US. I also compete in tenpin bowling. I have a background in economics, statistics, history, management, marketing and accounting. My wife and I live in Brisbane, Australia.' The reason for quoting the author's version of his resume is that it offers a fine example of what to expect in the style of writing of this ultimately navigable treatise on the history of and the value and frustrations of daylight saving time. His other books includes some of the best historical fiction available – “Through the Eyes of Thomas Pamphlet: Convict and Castaway” and ‘”A Weaver’s Web.”

Who truly understands Daylight saving time? It is usually a topic of grumbling about changing clocks, altering morning and evening schedules, and other manifestations of jetlag behavior. Finally, in this learned book, Chris Pearce enlightens us, presents both sides of the fence of those who find it beneficial and those who wish it would go away!

From his Preface we begin to understand the history – ‘Daylight saving time has been described as one of the most controversial issues in modern history. More than a century after it first came into the British Parliament in 1908 as a bill, the mere mention of daylight saving produces strong reactions from supporters and opponents alike. This encyclopedia of daylight saving time commemorates 100 years of the scheme since it was first introduced nationally in 1916 by European countries on both sides of World War I to save fuel. Part I examines the origins of daylight saving, including the historical development of calendars, clocks, standard time, and the idea of changing the clock to give more daylight late in the day. Part II looks at the history of daylight saving in the United Kingdom and Europe, while Part III covers the United States, Canada and the rest of North America. Australia and New Zealand are dealt with in Part IV. Daylight saving experiences of Asian, South American and African countries appear in Part V. An appendix details all years of daylight saving time for every country plus each state of the US, Canada (provinces), Australia and Brazil. The Great Daylight Saving Time Controversy features many intriguing and often prolonged battles between advocates and critics of daylight saving in countries around the world, as well as lighter moments. It highlights the determination of daylight saving time champions such as the UK’s William Willett, the US’s Robert Garland and Harley Staggers, New Zealand’s Thomas Sidey and Tasmania’s John Steer. It delves into the chaotic daylight saving situations that emerged, notably in the US and Canada, but also elsewhere. Every country and sometimes each state has a different and usually controversial story to tell. The sheer number of policy changes in some countries and states is astounding… By the term daylight saving time (DST), or just daylight saving, we really mean daylight shifting. There is of course no extra daylight. An hour more daylight in the evening is balanced by an hour less in the morning although in a sense daylight is “saved” from the early part of the day and used later. Other terms for the measure include daylight time, advanced time and fast time (all common in the US), summer time (common in the UK and Europe and parts of Asia and South America), and daylight savings time, usually regarded as incorrect. Australia mainly calls it daylight saving while Canada uses several of the terms.’

Through the use of extensive research (all backed by source references throughout), tables, illustrations, and some fine journalistic quips Chris walks us through the enigma of this controversial manipulation of mind and time. And at the end of this comprehensive book he closes by stating, ‘Daylight saving appears to be here to stay. Controversy will no doubt persist in many countries and states over whether to put the clocks forward all year, just in the warmer months, or not at all. Most people have firmly entrenched views, often depending on their lifestyle and where they live. The scheme is likely to remain largely a city versus country issue and revolve around factors such as energy savings, more light for evening activities, unsuitability in farming areas, children going to school in the dark, and climate. The amount of time and money spent by parliaments, councils, organisations and individuals in trying to decide the time or influence the process over more than a century across most countries and states would be impossible to calculate. Daylight saving has been one of the most controversial issues of the modern era and this looks set to continue into the foreseeable future and quite likely beyond.’

Informative and even entertaining, this is the ‘bible’ for the topic of Daylight saving time. Grady Harp, April 17
4.0 out of 5 stars so don’t waste any more time reading this and go read it 2 May 2017
By Julius Z - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A guide about saving time during daylight….
Well to start, this is something that has been bothering me since a while ago, this has even get me headaches, and I think this is a very lengthy but valuable book, if you have the patience to read it.
This is something that it’s been around since World War I, according to the description the armies have to manage their time to work during daylight to save fuel, but this is more than save resources, it’s something bigger we all ignore.
Managing time has become harder and harder every year, everything seems to be moving faster, and for those who are working and taking care of others, the hours don’t seem to be lasting for enough minutes for no one. I will say the information this book provides is enough to justify for anyone to buy it, especially those who have heavy days with meetings, this is not a book full of tips about what to do every minute and how to improve your routine, is about literally living and make it worth every minute of your life, so don’t waste any more time reading this and go read it!
3.0 out of 5 stars Abundance of details, yet fun facts also included. Select the country or continent of choice 2 July 2017
By Henk-Jan van der Klis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The question why there's Daylight Saving Time pops up twice a year, in our case in the Netherlands at the end of March and October. In The Great Daylight Saving Time Controversy, author Chris Pearce shows that applying Daylight Saving time is not an obvious global practice. In this information-rich 400 pages book, he discloses the measurement of time. From ancient lunar and solar calendars, naming of days and months, differences between the calendar used in the Western world, compared to e.g. Jewish, and Chinese calendars, and the determination of time zones: 50 pages are devoted to bringing your knowledge up-to-date.

Where mean times and time zone boundaries started to conflict with the wish for uniform time schedules in public transport and telecommunications in the 19th Century, a solution was proposed, that eventually led to what we now know as Daylight Saving Time from the 20th Century. In every country on every continent, Antartica included, setting a start and end date to a yearly daylight saving period turned out to be one of the most sensitive topics in politics. Bills were issued, neglected, abandoned, re-applied, especially in war times and fuel shortages, e.g. the Oil Crisis in the 70's. Tens of pages are provided for every continent, including tables and statistics of DST application, effects and voting outcomes.

This level of detail makes the book less readable, or interesting to read as a whole. As the book kicked off with Europe, I was used to the way Peace writes, when the chapters on the Americas, Asia, and Africa started. Honestly, I skipped a lot in the latter part of the book, although the Daylight Saving Time on Antartica, but also in large countries like Australia, the U.S.A., and China had my interest. Surprises are e.g. the great-great-grandson of the 'builder and originator' of Daylight Saving Time, William Willet (1865-1915) being Chris Martin, who wrote Clocks in 2004, a Coldplay mega hit. Pearce throws in poems, pictures, and original books, to spice up his creation.

"Daylight saving appears to be here to stay. Controversy will no doubt persist in many countries and states over whether to put the clocks forward all year, just in the warmer months or not at all. Most people have firmly entrenched views, often depending on their lifestyle and where they live."
4.0 out of 5 stars A encyclopaedia of interesting research 12 May 2017
By H.Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The Great Daylight Saving Time Controversy by Chris Pearce is an encyclopaedia commemorating 100 years of the scheme since it was first brought in by the British Parliament in 1908 and introduced nationally in 1916 by European Countries on both sides of WW1 to save fuel.

I have to be honest and find myself on the team that feels that it would be much better in this day and age to scrap this scheme and just leave it as summer time but reading this and it explaining about how it came about and also all the research I have been swayed to be on team The Great Daylight Saving Time. The book is made up of 5 parts, part 1 spoke about the origins of daylight savings. Part 2 looked at the history of this in the UK and Europe, part 3 covered the USA, Canada and the rest of North America. Australia and New Zealand are spoken about in part 4 and in the final chapter the author writes about Asian, South American and African Countries.

This book is jam packed with research and unless it's something you really want to study in depth at once, I personally preferred to dip in and out, there's no way you can take all this information in during one read. Great job though an ideal point of reference.

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