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Game of Mates: How favours bleed the nation by [Cameron Murray, Paul Frijters]

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Game of Mates: How favours bleed the nation Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 60 ratings

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Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B06Y1WF2BC
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Cameron Murray and Paul Frijters (4 April 2017)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 3704 KB
  • Simultaneous device usage ‏ : ‎ Unlimited
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Screen Reader ‏ : ‎ Supported
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 226 pages
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.6 out of 5 stars 60 ratings

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
4.6 out of 5
60 global ratings
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Top reviews from Australia

Reviewed in Australia on 8 May 2017
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11 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in Australia on 5 July 2018
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4 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in Australia on 6 October 2019
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3 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in Australia on 12 August 2017
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4 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in Australia on 3 September 2018
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5.0 out of 5 stars No conspiracy - just the worst of human nature
By Nick Marshall on 3 September 2018
We all know that the trading of favours goes on but this book gathers the evidence in a systematic way to show that what has always gone on between people has reached epidemic proportions. I am not a conspiracy theorist and, mercifully, neither is the author. He takes pains to point out that he does not believe that Australia (or anywhere) is run by a secret group of evil people. He does point the finger at the neocon ideas and his own beliefs are clearly on the left side of the fence but he does not get bogged down with wild conspiracy claims.
The book is detailed and contains many quite complex ideas. I understood it a lot better on my second reading. I think it is a very important book because it takes such a deep look at the way Australia is run today. Its weakness is that it never really gets to grips with the question of whether it has always been like this or whether the behaviour of people in positions of power and influence have always been so selfish/narcissistic to the extent of fundamentally endangering themselves as well as everyone else. A good polity understands that the principles of ecology do apply to human society. The present political/corporate spectrum is a line of complacent bums in the air and heads in the sand. I don't think this has always been so. While this book is certainly worth reading for its very substantial survey of the present state of society in Australia, I think that the ideas presented by the writer Robert Prechter (The Socionomic Theory of Finance and other books) are a better explanation for the present dismal outlook. Prechter does not get stuck with political explanations. He sees human behaviour as cyclical and makes a good argument for the reasons for this.
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3 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in Australia on 1 January 2018
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3 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Thaumatechnician
4.0 out of 5 stars Economists point out what should be bleedin' obvious to everyone.
Reviewed in the United States on 25 October 2017
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3 people found this helpful
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Peter Cunningham
5.0 out of 5 stars How life in (at least) Australia works.
Reviewed in the United States on 7 December 2019
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2 people found this helpful
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Sarah Collins
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant
Reviewed in the United States on 15 July 2017
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Mr. U. Stephenson-Ward
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent
Reviewed in the United States on 19 May 2018
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GK
5.0 out of 5 stars Well researched, informative and easy to read. An excellent book.
Reviewed in the United States on 30 October 2017
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One person found this helpful
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