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The End of Power: From Boardrooms to Battlefields and Churches to States, Why Being In Charge Isn't What It Used to Be by [Moises Naim]
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The End of Power: From Boardrooms to Battlefields and Churches to States, Why Being In Charge Isn't What It Used to Be Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 319 ratings

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Review

"Who is in charge? This book says nobody. The monopolies of coercion that characterised states, the potency of advanced militaries, the media organisations that controlled information, and the religious institutions that defined orthodoxy are all losing control. Readers may disagree; they will be provoked." -- Financial Times, Best of the Year "It's not just that power shifts from one country to another, from one political party to another, from one business model to another, Naim argues; it's this: "Power is decaying." -- Gordon M. Goldstein, Washington Post, Notable Non-Fiction Book of the Year "A remarkable new book by the remarkable Moises Naim, the former editor of Foreign Policy. It was recommended to me by former president Bill Clinton during a brief conversation on the situation in Egypt." --Richard Cohen, Washington Post "In his new book called The End of Power, Moises Naim goes so far as to say that power is actually decaying. I actually find the argument rather persuasive." --General Martin Dempsey-Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff "I particularly enjoyed The End of Power by Moises Naim... It is particularly relevant for big institutions like GE." --Jeff Immelt, CEO, GE "[An] altogether mind-blowing and happily convincing treatise about how 'power is becoming more feeble, transient, and constrained.'" --Nick Gillespie, Barron's "Moises Naim's The End of Power offers a cautionary tale to would-be Lincolns in the modern era. Naim is a courageous writer who seeks to dissect big subjects in new ways. At a time when critics of overreaching governments, big banks, media moguls and concentrated wealth decry the power of the '1%,' Mr. Naim argues that leaders of all types--political, corporate, military, religious, union--face bigger, more complex problems with weaker hands than in the past." --Wall Street Journal "Analytically sophisticated...[a] highly original, inter-disciplinary meditation on the degeneration of international power... The End of Power makes a truly important contribution, persuasively portraying a compelling dynamic of change cutting across multiple game-boards of the global power matrix." --Washington Post "This fascinating book...should provoke a debate about how to govern the world when more and more people are in charge." --Foreign Affairs "Naim produces a fascinating account of the way states, corporations and traditional interest groups are finding it harder to defend their redoubts... (He) makes his case with eloquence." --Financial Times "A timely and timeless book." --Booklist "Having served as editor-in-chief of Foreign Policy and the executive director of the World Bank, Naim knows better than most what power on a global scale looks like... [A] timely, insightful, and eloquent message." --Publishers Weekly, Starred Review "Foreign Policy editor-in-chief Naim argues that global institutions of power are losing their ability to command respect. Whether considering institutions of government, military, religion or business, the author believes their power to be in the process of decaying... A data-packed, intriguing analysis." --Kirkus Reviews "The End of Power will change the way you read the news, the way you think about politics, and the way you look at the world." --William Jefferson Clinton "In my own experience as president of Brazil I observed first hand many of the trends that Naim identifies in this book, but he describes them in a way that is as original as it is delightful to read. All those who have power--or want it--should read this book." --Fernando Henrique Cardoso "Moises Naim's extraordinary new book will be of great interest to all those in leadership positions--business executives, politicians, military officers, social activists and even religious leaders. Readers will gain a new understanding of why power has become easier to acquire and harder to exercise. The End of Power will spark intense and important debate worldwide." --George Soros "After you read The End of Power you will see the world through different eyes. Moises Naim provides a compelling and original perspective on the surprising new ways power is acquired, used, and lost--and how these changes affect our daily lives." --Arianna Huffington "Moises Naim is one of the most trenchant observers of the global scene. In The End of Power, he offers a fascinating new perspective on why the powerful face more challenges than ever. Probing into the shifting nature of power across a broad range of human endeavors, from business to politics to the military, Naim makes eye-opening connections between phenomena not usually linked, and forces us to re-think both how our world has changed and how we need to respond." --Francis Fukuyama --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

Book Description

"The End of Power makes a truly important contribution, persuasively portraying a compelling dynamic of change cutting across multiple game-boards of the global power matrix."-Washington Post --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B06XBVMFYX
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Basic Books; Illustrated edition (11 March 2014)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 1339 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Screen Reader ‏ : ‎ Supported
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 322 pages
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.3 out of 5 stars 319 ratings

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4.3 out of 5 stars
4.3 out of 5
319 global ratings

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Top reviews from Australia

Reviewed in Australia on 11 January 2015
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Reviewed in Australia on 12 February 2015
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Joseph Augustine
4.0 out of 5 stars The political world is going hyper (dash) MMM, and responding with demagogues..what is going on?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 26 February 2016
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JW Tan
4.0 out of 5 stars More description than analysis
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 10 February 2015
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#Boomdelish
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 29 October 2019
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Lyndon M.
4.0 out of 5 stars Informed and enjoyable reading in 2017
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 7 October 2017
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DoctorJeal
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow. What a read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 2 February 2015
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