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Empire of Guns: The Violent Making of the Industrial Revolution by [Satia, Priya]
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Empire of Guns: The Violent Making of the Industrial Revolution Kindle Edition


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Length: 544 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"Satia's detailed retelling of the Industrial Revolution and Britain's relentless empire expansion notably contradicts simple free market narratives. . . . She argues convincingly that the expansion of the armaments industry and the government's role in it is inseparable from the rise of innumerable associated industries from finance to mining. . . . Fascinating."--The New York Times

"A fascinating study of the centrality of militarism in 18th-century British life, and how imperial expansion and arms went hand in hand...This book is a triumph." --Guardian

"Satia marshals an overwhelming amount of evidence to show, comprehensively, that guns had a place at the center of every conventional tale historians have so far told about the origins of the modern, industrialized world. . . . Spanning four continents and three centuries, tackling the fundamental nature of industrialization and capitalism, Empire of Guns belongs to the last decade's resurgence in so-called 'big history'. . . . Though not presented as a political book, the implications of Satia's work are difficult to ignore. . . . This book leaves us with the disquieting notion that guns--whether the slow and inaccurate weapons of the eighteenth century or today's models--do more than alternately cloak or explore human inclination towards violence. They also shape it--not just at the individual level, as we are accustomed to debating, but at the societal, even civilizational or global, level as well. 'As we make objects, they make us.'"--The New Republic

"Sweeping and stimulating. . . . An extensively researched and carefully crafted narrative. . . . This important book helps us to look at British and United States history in an unconventional way and makes for great reading."--BookPage

"A solid contribution to the history of technology and commerce, with broad implications for the present." - Kirkus

"A fascinating and important glimpse into how violence fueled the industrial revolution, Priya Satia's book stuns with deep scholarship and sparkling prose." --Siddhartha Mukherjee, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Emperor of All Maladies

"Empire of Guns is a richly researched and probing historical narrative that challenges our understanding of the engines that drove Britain's industrial revolution. With this book, Priya Satia introduces Samuel Galton and the economies of guns and war into the historical equation and, with it, affirms her place as a deeply captivating and thought-provoking historian."--Caroline Elkins, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Imperial Reckoning

"Empire of Guns is an important revisionist account of the industrial revolution, reminding us that the making of the modern state and the making of modern capitalism were tightly intertwined. A revelatory book."--Sven Beckert, finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Empire of Cotton

"Empire of Guns boldly uncovers a history of modern violence and its central role in political, economic, and technological progress. As unsettling as it is bracing, it radically deepens our understanding of the 'iron cage' of modernity."--Pankaj Mishra, author of Age of Anger

"A strong narrative bolstered by excellent archival research. . . . Tremendous scholarship. . . . Satia's detailed and fresh look at the Industrial Revolution has appeal and relevance grounded in and reaching beyond history and social science to illuminate the complexity of present-day gun-control debates."--Booklist

Book Description

The revolutionary new understanding of how the gun trade facilitated the expansion of the British Empire and changed the course of world history

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 7926 KB
  • Print Length: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Duckworth (3 November 2018)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B07H2MVM6N
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #14,753 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)

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Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon.com

Amazon.com: 3.4 out of 5 stars 7 reviews
ReadsALot
3.0 out of 5 starsDisappointing due to an early lack of cement in the mortar, and intermittent moralizing.
27 August 2018 - Published on Amazon.com
4 people found this helpful.
Glenn LaVertu
5.0 out of 5 starsSome truly brilliant areas
11 October 2018 - Published on Amazon.com
7 people found this helpful.
Social worker
3.0 out of 5 starsLots of research, boring narrative
24 January 2019 - Published on Amazon.com
Samizdat
5.0 out of 5 starsSweeping Revisionist History of British Industrial Revolution
13 June 2018 - Published on Amazon.com
12 people found this helpful.
Ken P
4.0 out of 5 starsI really thought the book was mostly a waste of time
31 May 2018 - Published on Amazon.com
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3 people found this helpful.