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Courtiers: The Secret History of the Georgian Court by [Worsley, Lucy]

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Courtiers: The Secret History of the Georgian Court Kindle Edition

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Length: 432 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Language: English

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Review

“All those flowers placed outside Princess Diana's London home 13 summers ago are only the latest chapter in the history of one of those palaces where the walls could tell many a tale about the intersection of aristocracy and political culture.”—Martin Rubin, "The Wall Street Journal"

“Brilliantly entertaining … [she] writes with flair, bringing her characters to life … In spite of its accessible charm, "Courtiers "is a serious historical study which chisels much richness from the ornate, dingy, contradictory world of the palace.”—"Times Literary Supplement"

“As chief curator of the Historic Royal Palaces charity Worsley couldn’t have been in a better position to winkle out the secrets of one of the palaces under her aegis.  She has written a book that vividly brings to life the reigns of the first Hanoverian monarchs and almost humanises the two Georges … Worsley’s book is full of extraordinary charact

"All those flowers placed outside Princess Diana's London home 13 summers ago are only the latest chapter in the history of one of those palaces where the walls could tell many a tale about the intersection of aristocracy and political culture."--Martin Rubin, "The Wall Street Journal"

"Brilliantly entertaining ... [she] writes with flair, bringing her characters to life ... In spite of its accessible charm, "Courtiers "is a serious historical study which chisels much richness from the ornate, dingy, contradictory world of the palace."--"Times Literary Supplement"

"As chief curator of the Historic Royal Palaces charity Worsley couldn't have been in a better position to winkle out the secrets of one of the palaces under her aegis. She has written a book that vividly brings to life the reigns of the first Hanoverian monarchs and almost humanises the two Georges ... Worsley's book is full of extraordinary characters ... one of the most appealing characters is Caroline of Ansbach, queen to George II, a woman who would rather have been a philosopher than a ruler, ill-treated yet loved by her husband. Her agonising end, brilliantly described, brought me to tears ... a compelling book."--"The Express"

"We have a fine modern historian to guide us through the dreamlike maze of 18th-century palace life."--"The Times"

"Racy, amusing and informative. She brings the Georgian courts and their personalities to life ... extremely enjoyable."--"Literary Review"

"Threaded through with the stinging witticisms of 18th-century observers, Worsley's own prose bounces along."--"The Sunday Times"

"Now the definitive work on the early Hanoverian court ... The depth of Worsley's scholarship is demonstrated by the absence of fudged details. She clarifies points of etiquette and toilette, for example, that most historians of the 18th century only half understand ... As in her previous book, Cavalier, Worsley's style is wonderfully readable and her talent for empathy enormous. She

All those flowers placed outside Princess Diana's London home 13 summers ago are only the latest chapter in the history of one of those palaces where the walls could tell many a tale about the intersection of aristocracy and political culture. "Martin Rubin, The Wall Street Journal"

Brilliantly entertaining [she] writes with flair, bringing her characters to life In spite of its accessible charm, "Courtiers "is a serious historical study which chisels much richness from the ornate, dingy, contradictory world of the palace. "Times Literary Supplement"

As chief curator of the Historic Royal Palaces charity Worsley couldn't have been in a better position to winkle out the secrets of one of the palaces under her aegis. She has written a book that vividly brings to life the reigns of the first Hanoverian monarchs and almost humanises the two Georges Worsley's book is full of extraordinary characters one of the most appealing characters is Caroline of Ansbach, queen to George II, a woman who would rather have been a philosopher than a ruler, ill-treated yet loved by her husband. Her agonising end, brilliantly described, brought me to tears a compelling book. "The Express"

We have a fine modern historian to guide us through the dreamlike maze of 18th-century palace life. "The Times"

Racy, amusing and informative. She brings the Georgian courts and their personalities to life extremely enjoyable. "Literary Review"

Threaded through with the stinging witticisms of 18th-century observers, Worsley's own prose bounces along. "The Sunday Times"

Now the definitive work on the early Hanoverian court The depth of Worsley's scholarship is demonstrated by the absence of fudged details. She clarifies points of etiquette and toilette, for example, that most historians of the 18th century only half understand As in her previous book, Cavalier, Worsley's style is wonderfully readable and her talent for empathy enormous. She always takes a charitable view of superficially obnoxious people and sees half-invisible female figures very clearly haunts one's imagination. "The Sunday Telegraph"

An intimate account of life at court that at times reads like an 18th-century version of Heat magazine an exhilarating but unstable world, described with the relish of a court insider. "Waterstones Books Quarterly"

Worsley's book romps along breezily [and] the stories are fresh. "The Mail on Sunday"

The kind of captivating history I most enjoy: full of unexpected stories. It makes one look at Kensington Palace in an entirely new light. "Lady Antonia Fraser"

Lucy Worsley writes with flair and passion about a lost world where smiles could kill and kisses condemn. "Amanda Foreman"

Compulsively readable it is impossible not to want to know how they all end up. "Irish Examiner"

Worsley is Chief Curator for the Historic Royal Palaces and what she doesn't know about Kensington Palace isn't worth reading, and here she tells its lurid and enthralling story with all the flair, panache and vitality of a born raconteur. "Lancashire Evening Post"

The colourful goings-on at London's Kensington Palace during its heyday in 1714-60 are vividly described by Dr Lucy Worsley the book is packed with extraordinary characters most people know little about Georges I and II but Worsley fills that gap. "Leicester Mercury"

Brings to life the story of Kensington Palace as it was in the eighteenth century, with tales of sexual intrigue and bad behaviour conducted in the glittering drawing rooms and secret passages of this rabbit-warren of a place, where position and rank counted above everything, including personal happiness. "Angel Magazine"

Engaging and witty, yet also rigorous in its scholarship, "Courtiers" tells the scandalous stories of Kensington Palace in its Georgian hey-day. "Andrew Roberts""

All those flowers placed outside Princess Diana's London home 13 summers ago are only the latest chapter in the history of one of those palaces where the walls could tell many a tale about the intersection of aristocracy and political culture. Martin Rubin, The Wall Street Journal

Brilliantly entertaining [she] writes with flair, bringing her characters to life In spite of its accessible charm, Courtiers is a serious historical study which chisels much richness from the ornate, dingy, contradictory world of the palace. Times Literary Supplement

As chief curator of the Historic Royal Palaces charity Worsley couldn't have been in a better position to winkle out the secrets of one of the palaces under her aegis. She has written a book that vividly brings to life the reigns of the first Hanoverian monarchs and almost humanises the two Georges Worsley's book is full of extraordinary characters one of the most appealing characters is Caroline of Ansbach, queen to George II, a woman who would rather have been a philosopher than a ruler, ill-treated yet loved by her husband. Her agonising end, brilliantly described, brought me to tears a compelling book. The Express

We have a fine modern historian to guide us through the dreamlike maze of 18th-century palace life. The Times

Racy, amusing and informative. She brings the Georgian courts and their personalities to life extremely enjoyable. Literary Review

Threaded through with the stinging witticisms of 18th-century observers, Worsley's own prose bounces along. The Sunday Times

Now the definitive work on the early Hanoverian court The depth of Worsley's scholarship is demonstrated by the absence of fudged details. She clarifies points of etiquette and toilette, for example, that most historians of the 18th century only half understand As in her previous book, Cavalier, Worsley's style is wonderfully readable and her talent for empathy enormous. She always takes a charitable view of superficially obnoxious people and sees half-invisible female figures very clearly haunts one's imagination. The Sunday Telegraph

An intimate account of life at court that at times reads like an 18th-century version of Heat magazine an exhilarating but unstable world, described with the relish of a court insider. Waterstones Books Quarterly

Worsley's book romps along breezily [and] the stories are fresh. The Mail on Sunday

The kind of captivating history I most enjoy: full of unexpected stories. It makes one look at Kensington Palace in an entirely new light. Lady Antonia Fraser

Lucy Worsley writes with flair and passion about a lost world where smiles could kill and kisses condemn. Amanda Foreman

Compulsively readable it is impossible not to want to know how they all end up. Irish Examiner

Worsley is Chief Curator for the Historic Royal Palaces and what she doesn't know about Kensington Palace isn't worth reading, and here she tells its lurid and enthralling story with all the flair, panache and vitality of a born raconteur. Lancashire Evening Post

The colourful goings-on at London's Kensington Palace during its heyday in 1714-60 are vividly described by Dr Lucy Worsley the book is packed with extraordinary characters most people know little about Georges I and II but Worsley fills that gap. Leicester Mercury

Brings to life the story of Kensington Palace as it was in the eighteenth century, with tales of sexual intrigue and bad behaviour conducted in the glittering drawing rooms and secret passages of this rabbit-warren of a place, where position and rank counted above everything, including personal happiness. Angel Magazine

Engaging and witty, yet also rigorous in its scholarship, Courtiers tells the scandalous stories of Kensington Palace in its Georgian hey-day. Andrew Roberts

"

"All those flowers placed outside Princess Diana's London home 13 summers ago are only the latest chapter in the history of one of those palaces where the walls could tell many a tale about the intersection of aristocracy and political culture." --Martin Rubin, The Wall Street Journal

"Brilliantly entertaining ... [she] writes with flair, bringing her characters to life ... In spite of its accessible charm, Courtiers is a serious historical study which chisels much richness from the ornate, dingy, contradictory world of the palace." --Times Literary Supplement

"As chief curator of the Historic Royal Palaces charity Worsley couldn't have been in a better position to winkle out the secrets of one of the palaces under her aegis. She has written a book that vividly brings to life the reigns of the first Hanoverian monarchs and almost humanises the two Georges ... Worsley's book is full of extraordinary characters ... one of the most appealing characters is Caroline of Ansbach, queen to George II, a woman who would rather have been a philosopher than a ruler, ill-treated yet loved by her husband. Her agonising end, brilliantly described, brought me to tears ... a compelling book." --The Express

"We have a fine modern historian to guide us through the dreamlike maze of 18th-century palace life." --The Times

"Racy, amusing and informative. She brings the Georgian courts and their personalities to life ... extremely enjoyable." --Literary Review

"Threaded through with the stinging witticisms of 18th-century observers, Worsley's own prose bounces along." --The Sunday Times

"Now the definitive work on the early Hanoverian court ... The depth of Worsley's scholarship is demonstrated by the absence of fudged details. She clarifies points of etiquette and toilette, for example, that most historians of the 18th century only half understand ... As in her previous book, Cavalier, Worsley's style is wonderfully readable and her talent for empathy enormous. She always takes a charitable view of superficially obnoxious people and sees half-invisible female figures very clearly ... haunts one's imagination." --The Sunday Telegraph

"An intimate account of life at court that at times reads like an 18th-century version of Heat magazine ... an exhilarating but unstable world, described with the relish of a court insider." --Waterstones Books Quarterly

"Worsley's book romps along breezily [and] the stories are fresh." --The Mail on Sunday

"The kind of captivating history I most enjoy: full of unexpected stories. It makes one look at Kensington Palace in an entirely new light." --Lady Antonia Fraser

"Lucy Worsley writes with flair and passion about a lost world where smiles could kill and kisses condemn." --Amanda Foreman

"Compulsively readable ... it is impossible not to want to know how they all end up." --Irish Examiner

"Worsley is Chief Curator for the Historic Royal Palaces and what she doesn't know about Kensington Palace isn't worth reading, and here she tells its lurid and enthralling story with all the flair, panache and vitality of a born raconteur." --Lancashire Evening Post

"The colourful goings-on at London's Kensington Palace during its heyday in 1714-60 are vividly described by Dr Lucy Worsley ... the book is packed with extraordinary characters ... most people know little about Georges I and II but Worsley fills that gap." --Leicester Mercury

"Brings to life the story of Kensington Palace as it was in the eighteenth century, with tales of sexual intrigue and bad behaviour conducted in the glittering drawing rooms and secret passages of this rabbit-warren of a place, where position and rank counted above everything, including personal happiness." --Angel Magazine

"Engaging and witty, yet also rigorous in its scholarship, Courtiers tells the scandalous stories of Kensington Palace in its Georgian hey-day." --Andrew Roberts

Product Description

In the eighteenth century, the palace's most elegant assembly room was in fact a bloody battlefield. This was a world of skulduggery, politicking, wigs and beauty-spots, where fans whistled open like flick-knives.

Ambitious and talented people flocked to court of George II and Queen Caroline in search of power and prestige, but Kensington Palace was also a gilded cage. Successful courtiers needed level heads and cold hearts; their secrets were never safe. Among them, a Vice Chamberlain with many vices, a Maid of Honour with a secret marriage, a pushy painter, an alcoholic equerry, a Wild Boy, a penniless poet, a dwarf comedian, two mysterious turbaned Turks and any number of discarded royal mistresses.

An eye-opening portrait of a group of royal servants, Courtiers also throws new light on the dramatic life of George II and Queen Caroline at Kensington Palace.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 9554 KB
  • Print Length: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (6 May 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004WMUA8O
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #13,692 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)

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Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars 78 reviews
A McKenna
3.0 out of 5 stars Good subject matter, flawed result
8 January 2020 - Published on Amazon.com
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M. A Newman
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Britains
30 November 2014 - Published on Amazon.com
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3 people found this helpful
Lauren
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought-Provoking and Enjoyable
11 September 2013 - Published on Amazon.com
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Amelia Gremelspacher
4.0 out of 5 stars ""The palace's most elegant assembly room was in fact a bloody battlefield."
19 August 2013 - Published on Amazon.com
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One person found this helpful
E. Massey
4.0 out of 5 stars Engaging Glimpse into the Georgian Court
31 August 2013 - Published on Amazon.com
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2 people found this helpful