You don't need to own a Kindle device to enjoy Kindle books. Download one of our FREE Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on all your devices.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: $10.99
includes tax, if applicable

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Am I Black Enough For You? by [Heiss, Anita]
Kindle App Ad

Am I Black Enough For You? Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
$10.99

Length: 352 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Language: English

Kindle Daily Deal: Save at least 70%
Each day we unveil a new book deal at a specially discounted price - for that day only. See today's deal or sign up for the newsletter

Product description

Product Description

The story of an urban-based high achieving Aboriginal woman working to break down stereotypes and build bridges between black and white Australia.

I'm Aboriginal. I'm just not the Aboriginal person a lot of people want or expect me to be.

What does it mean to be Aboriginal? Why is Australia so obsessed with notions of identity? Anita Heiss, successful author and passionate campaigner for Aboriginal literacy, was born a member of the Wiradjuri nation of central New South Wales, but was raised in the suburbs of Sydney and educated at the local Catholic school. She is Aboriginal - however, this does not mean she likes to go barefoot and, please, don't ask her to camp in the desert.

After years of stereotyping Aboriginal Australians as either settlement dwellers or rioters in Redfern, the Australian media have discovered a new crime to charge them with: being too 'fair-skinned' to be an Australian Aboriginal. Such accusations led to Anita's involvement in one of the most important and sensational Australian legal decisions of the 21st-century when she joined others in charging a newspaper columnist with breaching the Racial Discrimination Act. He was found guilty, and the repercussions continue.

In this deeply personal memoir, told in her distinctive, wry style, Anita Heiss gives a first-hand account of her experiences as a woman with an Aboriginal mother and Austrian father, and explains the development of her activist consciousness.

Read her story and ask: what does it take for someone to be black enough for you?

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 651 KB
  • Print Length: 352 pages
  • Publisher: RHA eBooks Adult (2 April 2012)
  • Sold by: Random House Australia
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007C6VAK4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #110,660 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

click to open popover

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
As Indigenous Australian, I could completely relate to this book. It gives a wonderfully honest insight into not just being Indigenous person but also a professional woman in modern day Australia.
I would like it to be noted that in no way is this book about bashing the white man or the colonisation of Australia. It is about learning how to move forward as a nation with understanding one and another.
Anita is wise beyond her years and she has helped me as an Indigenous woman see many topics from a different view but more importantly understand them.
Personally, I think it would be great if this book was in the Secondary Schools books Curriculum. I have two teenage boys and I already have one of them reading this book. I think all Australians should read this book. It is time for us all to come together as a nation.
The main lesson I learnt from Anita was instead of seeing people's differences maybe we should be looking for similarities.
One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
When culture is defined it is a generalisation at best, which always excludes someone (usually lots of people) and at the same time doesn't describe any-one person. So it is when someone wants to define Aboriginality, and particularly so when non-Aboriginal people do it. While the book loosely centres around the Andrew Bolt court case, it is primarily a collection of the authors perspective on Aboriginality, culture and individuality; Anita's memoirs you could say. A good read, I personally enjoyed the first half, more than the last half.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
I loved this. Anita is not being 'safe' in her approach and expression....what a relief. Please Sonya (fellow reviewer) just suspend and go with it...... I support the ethos of sharing each others experiences.....if we are a member of a majority , comfortable,white, privileged population we need to pause and listen.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By ann on 25 November 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Extremely well written, easy to read. Informative, interesting. She has achieved so much.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This lady is so annoyed with the way the world has treated her, and other people with her background. She tells us so many times, and the repetition is not useful. Perhaps she was given a word limit, and felt she had to repeat material, because she didn't have enough to reach the limit? She also forgets that there are other groups of people who are not treated well by the world.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse